An Address, Delivered in the New Court House, in Springfield, Hampden County, Massachusetts: At the Dedication of the Same, April 28, 1874, Containing Sketches of the Early History of the Old County of Hampshire and the County of Hampden, and of the Members of the Bar in Those Counties, with an Appendix (Google eBook)

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C.W. Bryan & Company, Printers, 1874 - Hampden County (Mass.) - 96 pages
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Page 11 - It must not be; there is no power in Venice Can alter a decree established: 'Twill be recorded for a precedent; And many an error, by the same example, Will rush into the state: it cannot be.
Page 11 - I will be bound to pay it ten times o'er, On forfeit of my hands, my head, my heart: If this will not suffice, it must appear That malice bears down truth. And I beseech you, Wrest once the law to your authority: To do a great right, do a little wrong; And curb this cruel devil of his will.
Page 8 - Wherefore that here we may briefly end : of Law there can be no less acknowledged, than that her seat is the bosom of God, her voice the harmony of the world : all things in heaven and earth do her homage, the very least as feeling her care, and the greatest as not exempted from her power : both Angels and men and creatures of what condition soever, though each in different sort and manner, yet all with uniform consent, admiring her as the mother of their peace and joy.
Page 13 - Finally, brethren, whatsoever things are true, whatsoever things are honest, whatsoever things are just, whatsoever things are pure, whatsoever things are lovely, whatsoever things are of good report ; if there be any virtue, if there be any praise, think on these things.
Page 81 - He was bred to the law, which is, in my opinion, one of the first and noblest of human sciences ; a science which does more to quicken and invigorate the understanding, than all the other kinds of learning put together ; but it is not apt, except in persons very happily born, to open and to liberalize the mind exactly in the same proportion.
Page 9 - And therefore if all the reason that is dispersed into so many several heads were united into one, yet could he not make such a law as the law of England is; because by many successions of ages, it hath been fined and refined by an infinite number of grave and learned men...
Page 8 - Reason is the life of the law, nay, the common law itself is nothing else but reason...
Page 79 - What is the worst of woes that wait on age? What stamps the wrinkle deeper on the brow? To view each loved one blotted from life's page, And be alone on earth, as I am now.
Page 11 - Septimus, no man who is not a lawyer would ever know how to act, and no man who is a lawyer would, in many instances, know what to advise, unless courts were bound by authority, as firmly as ,the pagan deities were supposed to be bound by the decrees of fate.
Page 9 - And first of all the science of jurisprudence, the pride of the human intellect, which, with all its defects, redundancies, and errors, is the collected reason of ages, combining the principles of original justice with the infinite variety of human concerns, as a heap of old exploded errors, would be no longer studied.

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