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Books Books 1 - 10 of 38 on Thus, the proposition, that the three angles of a triangle are not equal to two right....  
" Thus, the proposition, that the three angles of a triangle are not equal to two right angles... "
Inside Out, Or, An Interior View of the New-York State Prison: Together with ... - Page 64
by W. A. Coffey - 1823 - 251 pages
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Philosophical Principles of Religion: Natural and Revealed: in ..., Parts 1-2

George Cheyne - Natural theology - 1715
...feems as evident, as that no Body who has conftder'd the Matter, can be abfolutely convinc'd, that the three Angles of a Triangle are not equal to two right ones. The Fool indeed, may have [aid in his Heart there is no Cod, i. <?. lewd and vicious Men may...
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Cyropaedia, Or The Institution of Cyrus, Volume 1

Xenophon - 1770
...there are no antipodes ; that eclipfes will not happen according to aftronomical obfervations ; that the three angles of a triangle are not equal to two right ones ; or, upon refufal, they may inflict punifhment at will. But will and power are often ufed unjuftly...
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Correspondence

Frederick II (King of Prussia), Thomas Holcroft - Seven Years' War, 1756-1763 - 1789
...conquer. No man can deny that two and two make four 5 nor will any one think proper to affirm that the three angles of a triangle are not equal to two right angles. The fame may be faid of many things in politics, which may be proved with certitude approaching mathematical...
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The Cyropædia, Or, The Institution of Cyrus

Xenophon - History - 1803 - 367 pages
...antipodes; that eclipses will not hap* Cyropaedia. pen according to astronomical observations; that the three angles of a triangle are not equal to two right ones; or, upon refusal, they may inflict punishment at will. But will and power are often used unjustly...
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Cyropædia; or, The institution of Cyrus, tr. by the hon. M. Ashley

Xenophon (of Athens.) - 1803
...antipodes; that eclipses will not hap* Cyropaedia. pen according to astronomical observations; that the three angles of a triangle are not equal to two right ones; or, upon refusal, they may. inflict punishment at will. But will and power are often used unjustly...
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An introduction to the study of moral evidence

James Edward Gambier - 1806 - 12 pages
...though false, is yet not absurd, for there was a time when it was true. But the proposition that ' the three angles of a triangle are not equal to two right angles, is not only false, but also involves in it an absurdity. 5. There is a difference also in their force,...
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An Introduction to the Study of Moral Evidence: Or, of that Species of ...

James Edward Gambier - Evidence - 1808 - 203 pages
...though false, is yet not absurd ; for there was a time when it was true. But the proposition that ' the three angles of a triangle are not equal to two right angles,' is not only false, but also involves in it an absurdity. 5. There is a difference also in their force,...
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The elementary elocutionist: a selection of pieces in prose and verse, by J ...

John White (A.M.) - 1826
...? As well may you tell the Arithmetician that two and two make eight,—tell the Mathematician that the three angles of a triangle are not equal to two right angles,—tell the Agriculturalist that any kind of soil will grow any kind of grain,—or the Politician...
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Elements of intellectual philosophy: designed as a textbook

Thomas Cogswell Upham - Intellect - 1827 - 504 pages
...no consequence ; the opposite of it will always imply some fallacy. — Thus, the proposition, that the three angles of a triangle are not equal to two right angles, and other propositions, which are the opposite of what has been demonstrated, will always be found...
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The Lion, Volume 3

Richard Carlile - Rationalism - 1829
...perception, hath no more power to withstand, or not to adopt, than it hath power to persuade itself that the three angles of a triangle are not equal to two right angles, after having once understood the position which demonstrates that they are so. And as demonstrable...
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