Informal Logic: A Handbook for Critical Argumentation

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Cambridge University Press, 1989 - Philosophy - 292 pages
4 Reviews
This is an introductory guidebook to the basic principles of how to construct good arguments and how to criticeze bad ones. It is non-technical in its approach and is based on 150 key examples, each discussed and evaluated in clear, illustrative detail. Professor Walton, a leading authority in the field of informal logic, explains how errors, fallacies, and other key failures of argument occur. He shows how correct uses of argument are based on sound strategies for reasoned persuasion and critical responses. Among the many subjects covered are: forms of valid argument, relevance, appeals to emotion, personal attack, uses and abuses of expert opinion, problems in deploying statistics, loading terms, equivocation, arguments from analogy, and techniques of posing, replying to, and criticizing questions. The book will be ideally suited to courses in informal logic and in the introduction to philosophy. It will also prove valuable to studetns of pragmatics, rhetoric, and speech communication.
  

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Review: Informal Logic: A Handbook for Critical Argument

User Review  - loafingcactus - Goodreads

Anything by Walton is bound to be good and this is no exception. Many of my notes from this book will surely show up in future blog posts. Read full review

Review: Informal Logic: A Handbook for Critical Argument

User Review  - Andy Adkins - Goodreads

many books I have listed as to be read are more accurately listed as to be re-read (it seems dishonest to say that I am currently reading 8000 books when in actuality many are just source material which on occasion awaken curious efforts for value assessments Read full review

Contents

III
1
IV
3
V
9
VI
11
VII
16
VIII
19
IX
23
X
27
XLIV
141
XLV
149
XLVI
154
XLVII
159
XLVIII
163
XLIX
165
L
168
LI
172

XI
28
XII
31
XIII
35
XIV
39
XV
43
XVI
49
XVII
52
XVIII
54
XIX
60
XX
61
XXI
64
XXII
67
XXIII
71
XXIV
75
XXV
77
XXVI
82
XXVII
84
XXVIII
87
XXIX
90
XXX
93
XXXI
97
XXXII
101
XXXIII
103
XXXIV
105
XXXV
110
XXXVI
114
XXXVII
117
XXXVIII
121
XXXIX
124
XL
128
XLI
131
XLII
134
XLIII
135
LII
173
LIII
178
LIV
181
LV
184
LVI
189
LVII
192
LVIII
194
LIX
198
LX
200
LXI
204
LXII
206
LXIII
208
LXIV
212
LXV
215
LXVI
222
LXVII
224
LXVIII
228
LXIX
234
LXX
239
LXXI
240
LXXII
243
LXXIII
250
LXXIV
253
LXXV
256
LXXVI
260
LXXVII
263
LXXVIII
269
LXXIX
274
LXXX
277
LXXXI
282
LXXXII
287
Copyright

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Page 282 - Sophistry, like poison, is at once detected, and nauseated, when presented to us in a concentrated form ; but a Fallacy which when stated barely, in a few sentences, would not deceive a child, may deceive half the world, if diluted in a quarto volume.

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About the author (1989)

DOUGLAS N. WALTON is Professor of Philosophy at the University of Winnipeg and is currently a Killiam Research Fellow (1987-1989) of the Canada Council.

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