A Short History of Bookbinding (Google eBook)

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1895
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Page 8 - who loved the art, had his books bound under his own supervision in the most costly manner. His designs consisted of bold gold lines arranged geometrically with great accuracy, crossing one another and intermixed with small leaves or sprays. These were in outlines shaded or filled up with closely worked cross lines. Not, however,
Page 21 - The ornaments are often styled renaissance, being an entire change from the Gascon. The Derome is best exemplified in borders, Vandyke in design ; it is simple in construction, but rich in effect.
Page 15 - GLOSSARY OF STYLES AND TERMS USED IN BINDING, WITH A BRIEF ACCOUNT OF THE CELEBRATED BINDERS AND PATRONS OF BOOKBINDING FROM WHOM THE VARIOUS STYLES ARE NAMED, DESCRIPTION OF LEATHERS, ETC.
Page 6 - shelves, and had small cedar tablets hanging from them upon which their titles were inscribed. The ordinary books for general use were fastened strongly at the back, with wooden boards for the sides, and simply a piece of leather up the back. In the sixth century, bookbinding had already taken its place as an " Art,
Page 9 - perfection. Francis I. and the succeeding monarchs, with the French nobility, placed the art on such a high eminence, that even now we are compelled to look to these great masterpieces as models of style. Not only was the exterior elaborate in ornament, but the edges were gilded and tooled, and even painted.
Page 5 - pass on from these, and make another pause, when vellum strips were attached together in one continuous length with a roller at each end. The reader unrolled the one, and rolled the other as he perused the work. Books, prized either for their rarity, sacred character, or costliness, would be kept in a round box or case, so that the appearance of a library in Ancient Jerusalem would seem
Page 8 - The art of printing gave new life to our trade, and, during the fifteenth century, bookbinding made great progress on account of the greater facility and cheapness with which books were produced. The printer was then his own binder; but as books increased in number, bookbinding became a separate trade
Page 9 - satisfied with these simple traceries, he embellished them still more by staining or painting them black, green, red, and even with silver, so that they formed bands interlacing each other in a most graceful manner.
Page 6 - a silken string tied through one end so loosely as to admit of each leaf being laid down flat when turned over. When the mode of preserving MS. on animal membrane or vellum in separate leaves came into use, the binding was at first
Page 22 - filled with small floral ornaments, and the irregular spaces surrounding them with circular scrolls and branches of laurel and palm.

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