Black Abolitionists

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Da Capo Press, 1969 - Social Science - 310 pages
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While much is known about the white men and women who were involved in the anti-slavery movement, the black abolitionists have been largely ignored. This book, written by one of America’s leading black historians, sets the record straight. As Benjamin Quarles shows, blacks were anything but passive in the abolitionist movement. Many of the pioneers of abolition were black; dozens of black preachers and writers actively promoted the cause; black organizations were founded to support their brothers; black ambassadors for freedom crossed the Atlantic; blacks were instrumental in the operation of the Underground Railroad. Quarles puts it eloquently: ”To the extent that America had a revolutionary tradition [the black American] was its protagonist no less than its symbol.”
  

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Contents

Abolitions New Breed
3
Black Sowers of the Word
23
New Tissue for a Broken Body
42
Pulpit and Press
68
The Users of Adversity
90
Duet with John Bull
116
The Black Underground
143
The Politics of Freedom
168
Protests New Prophets
197
Shock Therapy and Crisis
223
Note on Bibliographical Literature
251
Notes
253
Index
293
Copyright

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Page 306 - April, 1775, was the day of founding the Pennsylvania society for promoting the abolition of slavery, the relief of free negroes unlawfully held in bondage, and for improving the condition of the African race.

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About the author (1969)

Benjamin Quarles (1904?1996) was a noted author, editor, and historian and the first African American to be published in what later became the Journal of American History. Africana hails him as a key figure in the emergence of African-American history as an academic discipline.

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