The New Negro

Front Cover
Alain Locke
Simon and Schuster, 1925 - Literary Collections - 452 pages
10 Reviews
From the man known as the father of the Harlem Renaissance comes a powerful, provocative, and affecting anthology of writers who shaped the Harlem Renaissance movement and who help us to consider the evolution of the African American in society.

With stunning works by seminal black voices such as Zora Neale Hurston, Countee Cullen, and W.E.B. DuBois, Locke has constructed a vivid look at the new negro, the changing African American finding his place in the ever shifting sociocultural landscape that was 1920s America. With poetry, prose, and nonfiction essays, this collection is widely praised for its literary strength as well as its historical coverage of a monumental and fascinating time in the history of America.
  

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LibraryThing Review

User Review  - AlCracka - LibraryThing

A phenomenal collection, including a balls-up selection of poetry from all the important voices of the Harlem Renaissance and some terrific essays. Well chosen and well commented on, this is the work that defined the Harlem Renaissance and it's indispensable. Not a false note in it. Read full review

Review: The New Negro

User Review  - Cara Byrne - Goodreads

This anthology, including Zora Neale Hurston's "Spunk" and many poems by Langston Hughes, Countee Cullen, Jean Toomer, and Claude McKay, is such a brilliant, important collection in the context of ... Read full review

Contents

Capital of the Black
333
Gift of the Black Tropics W A Domingo
341
The Negros Americanism Melville J Herskovits
353
The Paradox of Color Walter White
361
The Task of Negro Woman
369
The Negro Mind Reaches Out W E B DuBois
385
Whos Who of the Contributors 4 15
415
Negro Music 4 34
436
Negro Folk Lore 4 42
442
The Negro Race Problems _
449
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About the author (1925)

Locke began his educational experience at Howard University, where he organized the first literary movement and remained the faculty adviser of the university literary journal, the Stylus. He was the first Negro to receive a Rhodes Scholarship.

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