Lives of the Queens of England: From the Norman Conquest, Volume 4 (Google eBook)

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H. Colburn, 1851 - Queens
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Page 579 - ... midst and heat of the battle, to live or die amongst you all, to lay down for my God, and for my kingdom, and for my people, my honour and my blood, even in the dust. I know I have the body of a weak and feeble woman...
Page 580 - This England never did, (nor never shall,) Lie at the proud foot of a conqueror, But when it first did help to wound itself. Now these her princes are come home again, Come the three corners of the world in arms, And we shall shock them : Nought shall make us rue, If England to itself do rest but true.
Page 106 - Christ was the word that spake it; He took the bread and brake it ; And what the word did make it, That I believe and take it.
Page 457 - Stands and lives by me does what I have done; This too familiar care doth make me rue it. No means I find to rid him from my breast, Till by the end of things it be suppressed.
Page 295 - Since once I sat upon a promontory, And heard a mermaid on a dolphin's back Uttering such dulcet and harmonious breath. That the rude sea grew civil at her song, And certain stars shot madly from their spheres, To hear the sea-maid's music.
Page 699 - That day she was dressed in white silk, bordered with pearls of the size of beans, and over it a mantle of black silk, shot with silver threads; her train was very long, the end of it borne by a Marchioness; instead of a chain, she had an oblong collar of gold and jewels.
Page 296 - The doubt of future foes exiles my present joy, And wit me warns to shun such snares as threaten mine annoy. For falsehood now doth flow, and subjects' faith doth ebb ; Which would not be if Reason ruled, or Wisdom weaved the web. But clouds of toys untried do cloak aspiring minds, Which turn to rain of late repent by course of changed winds. The top of hope supposed the root of ruth will be ; And fruitless all their graffed guiles, as shortly ye shall see.
Page 462 - ... the English court in good habit (his clothes being then a considerable part of his estate), found the queen walking, till, meeting with a plashy place, she seemed to scruple going thereon. Presently...
Page 580 - Fitz-Eustace' heart felt closely pent ; As if to give his rapture vent, The spur he to his charger lent, And raised his bridle hand, And, making demi-volte in air, Cried, " Where's the coward that would not dare To fight for such a land !" The Lindesay smiled his joy to see; Nor Marmion's frown repress'd his glee.
Page 699 - Her bosom was uncovered, as all the English ladies have it till they marry ; and she had on a necklace of exceeding fine jewels. Her hands were small, her fingers long, and her stature neither tall nor low; her air was stately; her manner of speaking mild and obliging.

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