Outlines of practical sanitation: for students, physicians and sanitarians (Google eBook)

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J. Wiley & sons, 1906 - History - 208 pages
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Page 148 - Square was a receptacle for all the offal and cinders, for all the dead cats and dead dogs of Westminster. At one time a cudgel player kept the ring there. At another time an impudent squatter settled himself there, and built a shed for rubbish under the windows of the gilded saloons in which the first magnates of the realm, Norfolks, Ormonds, Kents, and Pembrokes, gave banquets and balls.
Page 149 - When such was the state of the region inhabited by the most luxurious portion of society, we may easily believe that the great body of the population suffered what would now be considered as insupportable grievances. The pavement was detestable ; all foreigners cried shame upon it. The drainage was so bad that in rainy weather the gutters soon became torrents. Several facetious poets have commemorated the fury with which these black rivulets roared down Snow Hill and Ludgate...
Page 20 - Fix the bulb of an atomizer to a small glass capillary tube, sufficiently long to reach to the bottom of the test-tube, and in such a manner that a definite quantity of air is forced from the bulb through the tube at each compression. To use: Fill the test-tube exactly to the mark with a saturated solution of lime-water, take the apparatus into the out-door air and find out how many compressions of the bulb are needed, driving the air slowly through the lime-water each time, to make the lime-water...
Page 106 - So commonly do I find ill-health associated with brilliant scholarship that one of the first questions I put to a young lady seeking my advice is, 'Did you stand high in school...
Page 143 - Actinomycosis, anterior poliomyelitis, anthrax, bubonic plague, cerebrospinal meningitis, chicken-pox, cholera, diphtheria, epidemic dysentery, erysipelas, German measles, glanders...
Page 120 - Next to the rising of the sun, nothing is more absolutely certain than the fact that successful vaccination, with reliable lymph, repeated with sufficient frequency, is a sure preventive against small-pox. And the fact next in order of positiveness is, that careful vaccination with pure lymph will convey to a person susceptible of small-pox, the vaccine disease or cowpox, and no other disease.
Page 34 - ... time they lie in shady or sunny lakes and bogs. The water of one of the branches of the north fork of Owens River, near the southeastern boundary of the Park, at an elevation of ninety-five hundred feet above the sea, is the best I ever found. It is not only delightfully cool and bright, but brisk, sparkling, exhilarating, and so positively delicious to the taste that a party of friends I led to it twenty-five years ago still praise it, and refer to it as " that wonderful champagne water ; "...
Page 149 - The pavement was detestable: all foreigners cried shame upon it. The drainage was so bad that in rainy weather the gutters soon became torrents. Several facetious poets have commemorated the fury with which these black rivulets roared down Snow Hill and Ludgate Hill, bearing to Fleet Ditch a vast tribute of animal and vegetable filth from the stalls of butchers and green-grocers.
Page 50 - ... of nitrates present. Test for Nitrites. Solutions required: 1. Sulphanilic acid. Dissolve 0.5 gramme of sulphanilic acid in 150 cc of dilute acetic acid (sp. gr. 104). 2. Naphthylamine acetate. Boil 0.1 gramme of solid naphthylamine in 20 cc of distilled water, filter through a plug of washed absorbent cotton and mix the filtrate with 180 cc of dilute acetic acid. 3. Standard sodiumnitrite solution.

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