American Annals of Education and Instruction, Volume 4 (Google eBook)

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Allen & Ticknor, 1834 - Education
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Page 126 - be self-baptised, with the name of ' wounded honor'— ' And now art thou cursed from the earth, which hath opened her mouth to receive thy brother's blood from thy hand! When thou tillest the ground, it shall not henceforth yield unto thee her strength. A fugitive and a vagabond shall thou be
Page 188 - that the light is sweet; that it is a pleasant thing for the eyes to behold the sun.' The sense of sight is, indeed, the highest bodily privilege, the purest physical pleasure, which man has derived from his Creator : — to see that wandering lire, after he has finished his journey through the nations,
Page 126 - of thy life. Thorns, also, and- thistles shall it bring forth unto thee. In the sweat of thy face shalt thou eat bread, till thou return unto the ground, for out of it wast thou taken.' Every cemetery, and every monument, and every record of the past, or the present, echoes the closing doom;
Page 69 - of the tongue itself, reading alone, as I have said, will attain this end, without charging the mind with the multiplied rules and intricacies of grammar.' He then goes on to recommend the double translation of Roger Ascham, but it is not necessary to repeat it. Our object lias been to give in detail a plan for beginning
Page 485 - COMBE'S PHYSIOLOGY. The Principles of Physiology applied to the preservation of Health, and the improvement of Physical and Mental Education. By Andrew Combe, MD, Fellow of the Royal College of Physicians of Edinburgh. New York: Harper & Brothers. 1834. 18mo. pp.
Page 212 - The purest way for a learner,' says Locke, ' is not to advance by jumps and large strides,—let that which he sets himself to learn next, be indeed the next; ie as nearly conjoined with what he already knows as possible; let it be distinct, but not remote from it.
Page 66 - by Ascham is, that the teacher should give him an English version of his own, to be retranslated into Latin. * * * ' When he bringeth it translated unto you, bring forth the place of Tully ; lay them together, compare the one with the other; commend his good choice and right placing of words;
Page 24 - what either of them is likely to do hereafter. For this I know, not only by reading of books in my study, but also by experience of life abroad in the world, that those which be commonly the wisest, the best learned, the best men also, when they be old, were never commonly the quickest of wit when they were young.
Page 374 - those winged particles, whose speed outstrips The flight of thought, were on their way, the earth Compassed its tedious circuit round and round, And, in the extremes of annual change, behold Six autumns fade, six springs renew their bloom. So fur from earth those mighty orbs revolve
Page 412 - shall be in thine heart; and thou shalt teach them diligently to thy children, and shalt talk of them, when thou sittest in the house, and when thou walkest by the

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