Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Books Books 1 - 10 of 40 on The purest way for a learner,' says Locke, ' is not to advance by jumps and large....  
" The purest way for a learner,' says Locke, ' is not to advance by jumps and large strides,—let that which he sets himself to learn next, be indeed the next; ie as nearly conjoined with what he already knows as possible; let it be distinct, but not remote... "
American Annals of Education and Instruction - Page 212
1834
Full view - About this book

An Essay Concerning Human Understanding, Volume 2

John Locke - Knowledge, Theory of - 1805 - 510 pages
...way for a learner in this, as in all other cases, is not to advance by jumps and large strides ; let that which he sets himself to learn next, be indeed the next; ie as nearly conjoined with what he knows already as is possible ; let it be distinct but not remote from it: Let it be new, and what he...
Full view - About this book

An essay concerning human understanding. Also, extr. from the author's works ...

John Locke - 1819
...way for a learner in this, as in all other cases, is not to advance by jumps and large strides; let that which he sets himself to learn next, be indeed the next; i. e, as nearly conjoined with what he knows already as is possible; let it be distinct but not remote...
Full view - About this book

Essay concerning human understanding (concluded) Defence of Mr. Locke's ...

John Locke - 1824
...way for a learner in this, as in all other cases, is not to advance by jumps and large strides ; let that which he sets himself to learn next, be indeed the next ; ie as nearly conjoined with what he knows already as is possible ; let it be distinct but not remote from it : Let it be new, and what...
Full view - About this book

The Works of John Locke, in Nine Volumes, Volume 2

John Locke - Knowledge, Theory of - 1824
...way for a learner in this, as in all other cases, is not to advance by jumps and large strides; let that which he sets himself to learn next, be indeed the next; ie as nearly conjoined with what he knows already as is possible; let it be distinct but not remote from it: Let it be new, and what he...
Full view - About this book

The Works of John Locke: Essay concerning human understanding (concluded ...

John Locke - 1824
...way for a learner in this, as in all other cases, is not to advance by jumps and large strides; let that which he sets himself to learn next, be indeed the next; ie as nearly conjoined with what he knows already as is possible; let it be distinct but not remote from it: Let it be new, and what he...
Full view - About this book

An essay concerning human understanding. To which are now added, i. analysis ...

John Locke - 1824
...way for a learner in this, as in all other cases, is not to advance by jumps and large strides; let that which he sets himself to learn next, be indeed the next; ie as nearly conjoined with what he knows already as is possible; let it be distinct but not remote from it: Let it be new, and what he...
Full view - About this book

An essay concerning human understanding. To which are now first added, i. an ...

John Locke - 1828
...way for a learner in this, as in all other cases, is not to advance by jumps and large strides; let that which he sets himself to learn next be indeed the next; ie as nearly conjoined with what he knows already as is possible; let it be distinct but not remote from it: let it be new, and what he...
Full view - About this book

An Essay Concerning Human Understanding: To which are Now First ..., Volume 3

John Locke - Knowledge, Theory of - 1828
...way for a learner in this, as in all other cases, is not to advance by jumps and large strides; let that which he sets himself to learn next be indeed the next; z. e. as nearly conjoined with what he knows already as is possible; let it be distinct but not remote...
Full view - About this book

American Annals of Education

Education - 1834
...mind had become prepared.' Read then, — study then, — in order. Let the next be indeed the next. ' The purest way for a learner,' says Locke, 'is not...indeed the next; ie as nearly conjoined with what But to attention—repetition—order—reflection must be added,in order to profit by observation,...
Full view - About this book

American Annals of Education and Instruction, and Journal of ..., Volume 4

William Channing Woodbridge, William Russell, William Andrus Alcott - Education - 1834
...mind had become prepared.' Read then, — study then, — in order. Let the next be indeed the next. ' The purest way for a learner,' says Locke,' is not...indeed the next; ie as nearly conjoined with what But to attention—repetition—order—rcflection must be added, in order to profit by observation,...
Full view - About this book




  1. My library
  2. Help
  3. Advanced Book Search
  4. Download EPUB
  5. Download PDF