Brain Korea 21 Phase II: A New Evaluation Model

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Rand Corporation, Jan 31, 2008 - Education - 276 pages
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The Brain Korea 21 Program (BK21), which seeks to make Korean research universities globally competitive and to produce more high-quality researchers in Korea, provides funding to graduate students and professors who belong to research groups at top universities. The authors develop quantitative and qualitative models to evaluate how well BK21 is fulfilling its goals and make suggestions for further stimulating Korean university research.
  

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Contents

Chapter One Introduction
1
Chapter Two Implications of Phase I Program Evaluations for Phase II Evaluations
9
Chapter Three A Logic Model for Evaluating BK21
21
Chapter Four Quantitative Model to Assess BK21 Program Outcomes
59
Chapter Five Metrics and MEasurement for Program Evaluation
111
Chapter Six Database Design to Support BK21 Program Evaluation and Measurement
161
Chapter Seven Future Development of BK21 and University Research in Korea
177
Chapter Eight Conclusions
195
Appendix B Interview Guides for Representatives of Participants Policymakers and Users Related to the University Research and Education System
209
Phase II
217
Appendix D Table with Lagged Outcomes
219
Appendix E Research Data Series
221
Appendix F Education Data Series
229
Appendix G Industry Data Series
237
Appendix H General Data Series
243
Bibliography
245

Appendix A Performance Evaluation Metrics Used in Previous Evaluations of Phase I
207

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About the author (2008)

Steven W. Popper (Ph.D., Economics, UC Berkeley) is a senior economist in RAND's International Policy Department and serves as Associate Director of the Science and Technology Policy Institute, as well as Professor of Science and Technology Policy in the RAND Graduate School.

Charles A. Goldman (PhD, Stanford University, Graduate School of Business-Economic Analysis and Policy) is an Economist at RAND and a professor of economics at the RAND Graduate School in Santa Monica, California.

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