Lady Nugent's Journal: Jamaica One Hundred Years Ago : Reprinted from a Journal Kept by Maria, Lady Nugent, from 1801 to 1815, Issued for Private Circulation in 1839 (Google eBook)

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Institute of Jamaica, 1907 - Jamaica - 404 pages
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Page 117 - An Abstract of the Evidence Delivered before a Select Committee of the House of Commons in the Years 1790, and 1791; on the Part of the Petitioners for the Abolition of the Slave Trade (London, 1791); Alexander Falconbridge, An Account of the Slave Trade on the Coast of Africa (London: J.
Page 78 - Such loads of all sorts of high, rich, and seasoned things, and really gallons of wine and mixed liquors as they drink! I observed some of the party, to-day, eat of late breakfasts, as if they had never eaten before - a dish of tea, another of coffee, a bumper of claret, another large one of hock-negus; then Madeira, sangaree, hot and cold meat, stews and fries, hot and cold fish pickled and plain, peppers, ginger sweetmeats, acid fruit, sweet jellies - in short, it was all as astonishing as it was...
Page 249 - HE WAS BORN AT MONTPELIER IN FRANCE, BUT LEFT THAT COUNTRY FOR HIS RELIGION AND CAME TO SETTLE IN THIS ISLAND, WHERE HE WAS SWALLOWED UP IN THE GREAT EARTHQUAKE IN THE YEAR 1692 AND BY THE PROVIDENCE OF GOD WAS BY ANOTHER SHOCK THROWN INTO THE SEA, AND MIRACULOUSLY SAVED BY SWIMMING UNTIL A BOAT TOOK HIM UP ; HE LIVED MANY YEARS AFTER IN GREAT REPUTATION, BELOVED BY ALL WHO KNEW HIM, AND MUCH LAMENTED AT HIS DEATH.
Page 249 - IN FRANCE, BUT LEFT THAT COUNTRY FOR HIS RELIGION AND CAME TO SETTLE IN THIS ISLAND, WHERE HE WAS SWALLOWED UP IN THE GREAT EARTHQUAKE IN THE YEAR 1692 AND BY THE PROVIDENCE OF GOD WAS BY ANOTHER SHOCK THROWN INTO THE SEA, AND MIRACULOUSLY SAVED BY SWIMMING UNTIL A BOAT TOOK HIM UP; HE LIVED MANY YEARS AFTER IN GREAT REPUTATION, BELOVED BY ALL WHO KNEW HIM, AND MUCH LAMENTED AT HIS DEATH...
Page 110 - Town till 1 2, being obliged to hold a Council this morning. This is really a great fatigue, and more than he ought to risk. - Major Gould seems to feel it infinitely more than General N., however; the latter looking as perfectly well and in good spirits as usual, while the poor Major appeared at least twenty years older. Unfortunately, soon after they came in, the horse, which drew the gig the whole way, died of the complaint they call the pant, which is very common with horses not bred in the West...
Page 78 - I don't wonder now at the fever the people suffer from here ó such eating and drinking I never saw ! Such loads of all sorts of high, rich, seasoned things, and really gallons of wine and mixed liquors as they drink ! I observed some of the party to-day eat of late breakfasts as if they had never eaten before ó a dish of tea, another of coffee, a bumper of claret, another large one of...
Page 131 - In the lower orders, they are the same, with the addition of conceit and tyranny considering the negroes as creatures formed merely to administer to their ease, and to be subject to their caprice; and I have found much difficulty to persuade those great people and superior beings, our white domestics, that the blacks are human beings, or have souls. I allude more particularly to our German and our other upper men-servants. It was curious to observe, when we were entering any town, the number of trunks,...
Page 174 - Dress at 7, for the ball given to me to-night, by the Assembly. Dear little George at my toilet. For the benefit of posterity I will describe my dress on this grand occasion. A crape dress, embroidered in silver spangles, also sent me by Madame Le Clerc, but much richer than that which I wore at the last ball. Scarcely any sleeves to my dress, but a broad silver spangled border to the shoulder straps. The body made very like a child's frock, tying behind, and the skirt round, with not much train....
Page xxxi - ... an act to oblige the several inhabitants of this island, to provide themselves with a sufficient number of white people, or pay certain sums of money, in case they shall be deficient, and applying the same to several uses...
Page 282 - Martin's (the Duchess of Port Royal as she is called) daughter, soon after breakfast. It is a sad thing to see even this good kind of woman in other respects, so easy on the subject of what a decent kind of woman in England would be ashamed of and shocked at. She told me of all her children by different fathers, with the greatest sang-froid. The mother is quite looked up to at Port Royal, and yet her life has been most profligate, as we should think, at least in England.

References from web pages

Lady Nugent's Journal of Her Residence in Jamaica from 1801 to ...
Lady Nugent's husband was governor of Jamaica, the most important of the highly prized British sugar colonies, during a critical period of the Napoleonic ...
www.questia.com/ library/ book/ lady-nugents-journal-of-her-residence-in-jamaica-from-1801-to-1805-by-verene-a-shepherd...

Jamaica Gleaner : Pieces of the Past: A cultural explication of ...
By Dr. Rebecca Tortello Lady Maria Nugent's Journal, written during her stay on the island from 1801-1807 as the wife of Governor General George Nugent, ...
www.jamaica-gleaner.com/ pages/ history/ story0050.htm

Lady Nugent's journal of her residence in Jamaica from 1801 to ...
Lady Nugent's journal of her residence in Jamaica from 1801 to 1805. By: Maria Nugent, Lady; Philip Wright. Type: English : Book : Non-fiction ...
worldcat.org/ wcpa/ top3mset/ 12798039

LADY NUGENTíS JOURNAL of her residence in Jamaica from 1801 to 1805
LADY NUGENTíS JOURNAL of her residence in Jamaica from 1801 to 1805. ďa critical period of the Napoleonic War.Ē First printed in 1839, 5 years after Maria ...
www.falmouth.packet.archives.dial.pipex.com/ HTMLobj-174/ Lady_Nugent_s_Journal__Jamaica_1801-1805_.doc

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