The history and description of fossil fuel, the collieries, and coal trade of Great Britain (Google eBook)

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Whittaker, 1835 - Coal mines and mining - 485 pages
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Page 388 - rowlets, fitting these rails, whereby the carnage is so easy, that one horse will draw down four or five chaldron of coals, and is an immense benefit to the coal merchants." In situations where these roads were inclined, and particularly
Page 383 - remarkable is their way-leaves ; for when men have pieces of ground between the colliery and the river, they sell leave to lead coals over their ground ; and so dear, that the owner of a rood of ground will expect 20 per annum for this
Page 353 - none but reredoses, and our heads did never ake. For as the smoke in those days was supposed to be a sufficient hardning for the timber of the house, so it was reputed a far better medicine to keep the good man and his family from the
Page 353 - was supposed to be a sufficient hardning for the timber of the house, so it was reputed a far better medicine to keep the good man and his family from the quacke or pose, wherewith, as then very few were acquainted.
Page 354 - when our houses were buylded of willowe then we had oken men, but nowe that our houses are come to be made of oke, our men are not only become willow, but a great many altogether of straw, which is a sore alteration.
Page 50 - In June 1747, the body of a woman was found six feet deep in a peat-moor in the Isle of Axholm, in Lincolnshire. The antique sandals on her feet afforded evidence of her having been buried there for many ages ; yet her nails, hair, and skin are described as having shown hardly any marks of decay.
Page 350 - Many thousand people are employed in this trade of coales : many live by working of them in the pits: many live by conveying them in waggons and wains to the river Tine : many men are employed in conveying the coals in keels from the stathes aboard the ships : one
Page 350 - gentlemen have, upon great hope of benefit, come into this country to hazard their monies in coale pits. Master Beaumont, a gentleman of great ingenuity, and rare parts, adventured into our mines with his thirty thousand pounds ; who brought with him many rare engines, not known then in these
Page 24 - long after it became the habitation of living beings, and thus he was inclined to assert the priority of the types of marine animals to those of the terrestrial, and to fancy, for example, that the testacea of the ocean existed first, until some of them, by gradual evolution, were " improved " into those inhabiting the land.
Page 51 - In a turbary on the estate of the Earl of Moira, in Ireland, a human body was dug up, a foot deep in gravel, covered with eleven feet of moss ; the body was completely clothed, and the garments seemed all to be made of hair. Before the use of

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