Night Has a Thousand Eyes

Front Cover
Pegasus Books, Apr 1, 2007 - Fiction - 344 pages
15 Reviews
"Cornell Woolrich's novels define the essence of noir nihilism."-Marilyn Stasio, The New York Times Book Review One of Cornell Woolrich's most famous novels, this classic noir tale of a con man struggling with his ability to see the future is arguably the author's best in its depiction of a doomed vision of predestination.
  

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Review: Night Has a Thousand Eyes

User Review  - Pop Bop - Goodreads

Relentless Tension - A Bleak Tale of Despair and Dread The operative word here is dread. All of the strands of the plot, all of the characters, all of the previous hints and developments move ... Read full review

Review: Night Has a Thousand Eyes

User Review  - Sean - Goodreads

The writing drew me in right away, but then it just kind of goes on and on. Which I suppose builds suspense. Sometimes. Other times it's like every tiniest detail of everything is lingered on. And on. And on. The story is interesting, but doesn't end up being surprising in any way. Read full review

Contents

The Meeting
3
The Telling
25
Beginning of the Wait
145
Beginning of Police Procedure
155
Bodyguard Against Planets
162
Dobbs and Sokolsky
178
Flight of the Faithful
186
Schaefer
193
Molloy
237
The Last Supper
251
Dobbs and Sokolsky
274
Midevening 284
287
Molloy
304
Moments Before Eternity
310
Hue and Cry
316
End of Police Procedure
324

Deeps of Night
213
Dobbs and Sokolsky
223
Farewell to Sunlight
231
End of the Wait
329
End of Night
336
Copyright

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About the author (2007)

From the 1930s until his death in 1968, Cornell Woolrich riveted the reading public with his mystery, suspense, and horror stories. Classic films like Hitchcock's "Rear Window "and Trauffaut's "The Bride Wore Black "and novels like "Night has a Thousand Eyes" and "The Black Angel" earned Woolrich epithets like "the twentieth century's Edgar Allen Poe" and "the father of noir.

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