Legends of Old Honolulu (Google eBook)

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Press of Geo. H. Ellis Company, 1915 - Legends - 282 pages
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Page 1 - a pleasant slope of restful land." "Honolulu" was probably a name given to a very rich district of farm land near what is now known as the junction of Liliha and School Streets, because its chief was Honolulu, one of the high chiefs of the time of Kakuhihewa, according to the legends. Kamakau, the Hawaiian historian, describes this...
Page 2 - The Oahu of Kakuhihewa." He divided the island among his favorite chiefs and officers, who gave their names to the places received by them from the king. Thus what is now known as Honolulu was until the time of Kamehameha I., about the year 1800, almost always mentioned as Kou, after the chief Kou, who was an ilamuku (marshal), under King Kakuhihewa. Kou appears to have been a small district, or, rather, a chief's group of houses and grounds, loosely defined as lying between Hotel Street and the...
Page 54 - Hono-kau-pu. My friend on the highest point of the surf. This is a good surf for us. My love has gone away. Smooth is the floor of Kou, Fine is the breeze from the mountains. I wait for you to return, The games are prepared, Pa-poko, pa-loa, pa-lele, Leap away to Tahiti By the path to Nuumealani (home of the gods,) Will that lover (Ouha) return? I belong to Hono-kau-pu, From the top of the tossing surf waves. The eyes of the day and the night are forgotten. Kou has the large konane board. This is...
Page 173 - Kawelo-mahamahala, was the king of Kauai. The land prospered and was quiet under him. When he died, the people worshipped him as a god. They said he had become a divine shark, watching over the seacoasts of his island. At last they thought it had become a stone...
Page 191 - ... consecrated mat. it was death, if he went upon the house of a chief, it was death, if he stood on those occasions, when he should prostrate himself, as for instance when the King's bathing water, or his kapa, or his malo was carried along.
Page 52 - Ka-nuku-o-Mamala" (The nose of Mamala). Mamala was a chiefess of kupua character. This meant that she was a mo-o, or gigantic lizard or crocodile, as well as a beautiful woman, and could assume whichever shape she most desired. One of the legends says that she was a shark and woman, and had for her husband the shark-man Ouha, afterward a shark-god having his home in the ocean near Koko Head. Mamala and Ouha drank awa together and played konane on the large smooth stone at Kou. Mamala was a wonderful...
Page 128 - Each cool breeze leaves its burden of moisture in a fleecy cloud to fall down the mountain side into the valley. So cloud follows cloud, descending the slopes of the foothills in gentle rain. Almost all day long the valley is open to the sun, which, looking on the luxuriant verdure and clinging mist, sends its abundant blessing of penetrating light, and rainbows upon rainbows are painted on the steep precipices at the head of the valley.
Page 134 - ... bananas on the altar, established the day for the tabu to begin and the day also when the tabu should be lifted. This was talked about by the people. By and by the high chief heard that a man had built a temple for his god, had made it tabu and had lifted the tabu. Kakuhihewa was living at Waikiki. He was the king after whom the island Oahu was named Oahu a Kakuhihewa (The Oahu of Kakuhihewa) . This was the especial name of Oahu for centuries. Kakuhihewa encouraged sports and games, and agriculture...
Page 123 - You may go before me." Namaka passed by on the outside and Pakuanui gave him a kick, knocking him over the Pali, expecting him to be dashed to pieces on the rocks at the foot of the precipice. But Namaka flew away from the edge of the Pali. The people who were watching said: "He went off. He flew off from the Pali like an lo bird, leaping into the air of Lanihuli, spreading out his arms like wings. When the strong wind twisted and whirled, Namaka was lifted like a kite by the wind, and hung among...
Page 192 - ... appointed to provide for the sacrifice. Not even their own relatives were spared in the search. Women were almost always exempt from this horrible termination of life. When a battle had been fought, many captives were sacrificed by both victor and vanquished. Infanticide was freely practised up to the time of the advent of the missionaries. Even for old people there was often but little love, and the aged and the infirm were left to care for themselves, or placed on the beach for the outstretched...

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