Programming Web Services with XML-RPC

Front Cover
"O'Reilly Media, Inc.", 2001 - Computers - 213 pages
1 Review
Have you ever needed to share processing between two or more computers running programs written in different languages on different operating systems? Or have you ever wanted to publish information on the Web so that programs other than browsers could work with it? XML-RPC, a system for remote procedure calls built on XML and the ubiquitous HTTP protocol, is the solution you've been looking for. Programming Web Services with XML-RPC introduces the simple but powerful capabilities of XML-RPC, which lets you connect programs running on different computers with a minimum of fuss, by wrapping procedure calls in XML and establishing simple pathways for calling functions. With XML-RPC, Java programs can talk to Perl scripts, which can talk to Python programs, ASP applications, and so on. You can provide access to procedure calls without having to worry about the system on the other end, so it's easy to create services that are available on the Web. XML-RPC isn't the only solution for web services; the Simple Object Access Protocol (SOAP) is another much-hyped protocol for implementing web services. While XML-RPC provides fewer capabilities than SOAP, it also has far fewer interoperability problems and its capabilities and limitations are much better understood. XML-RPC is also stable, with over 30 implementations on a wide variety of platforms, so you can start doing real work with it immediately. Programming Web Services with XML-RPC covers the details of five XML-RPC implementations, so you can get started developing distributed applications in Java, Perl, Python, ASP, or PHP. The chapters on these implementations contain code examples that you can use as the basis for your own work. This book also provides in-depth coverage of the XML-RPC specification, which is helpful for low-level debugging of XML-RPC clients and servers. And if you want to build your own XML-RPC implementation for another environment, the detailed explanations in this book will serve as a foundation for that work.
  

What people are saying - Write a review

User Review - Flag as inappropriate

EBOOK

Selected pages

Contents

Introduction
1
What XMLRPC Does
2
Where XMLRPC Excels
5
A Quick Tour of the Minefields
6
The XMLRPC Protocol
10
Data Types
13
Request Format
20
Response Format
26
Building XMLRPC Servers in PHP
100
Connecting Web Applications
105
What PHP and XMLRPC Can Do
116
XMLRPC and Python
117
Installing PythonWare XMLRPC
118
XMLRPC Clients
122
XMLRPC Servers
125
Integrating XMLRPC into a Web Server
136

The Nil Value
31
ClientServer Communication XMLRPC in Java
33
Why XMLRPC for Java?
34
The XMLRPC Java Library
36
Building XMLRPC Clients
41
Building XMLRPC Servers
43
Creating XMLRPC Handlers
47
Three Practical Examples
51
Moving Toward CrossPlatform PeertoPeer
63
XMLRPC and Perl
64
Perls Implementation of XMLRPC
65
Data Types
66
XMLRPC Clients
73
XMLRPC Servers
80
Integrating XMLRPC into a Web Server
86
Integrating Web Applications XMLRPC in PHP
89
Getting the XMLRPC Library for PHP
90
Mapping Data Between PHP and XMLRPC
91
Invoking Methods
96
Using Zope as an XMLRPC Server
139
Bridging XMLRPC and COM XMLRPC in ASP
140
Making Active Server Pages More Active
142
Data Types and the API
144
Building an Address Book Web Service with ASP
146
Talking to MS Access from Linux
154
An XMLRPC Client in ASP
156
Creating a Window to Linux
161
Connections and Caveats
164
XMLRPC and the Web Services Landscape
167
Public XMLRPC Services
168
Design Considerations for Any XMLRPC Application
169
Beyond XMLRPC
171
Protocol Design Choices
175
XMLRPC and Web Services
177
The XML You Need for XMLRPC
179
The HTTP You Need for XMLRPC
193
Index
207
Copyright

Common terms and phrases

References to this book

All Book Search results »

About the author (2001)

Simon St. Laurent is a web developer, network administrator, computer book author, and XML troublemaker living in Ithaca, NY. His books include XML: A Primer, XML Elements of Style, Building XML Applications, Cookies, and Sharing Bandwidth. He is a contributing editor to XMLhack.com and an occasional contributor to XML.com.

Joe Johnston is a graduate of the University of Massachusetts in Boston with a B.A. in computer science, he is a teacher, web designer, and author of articles for Perl Journal, Perl.com, and IBM's DeveloperWorks. Joe helps maintain the ASP XML-RPC library and wrote the Perl module Frontier::Responder.pm.

Edd is Managing Editor of XML.com. He also writes free software, and packages Bluetooth-related software for the Debian GNU/Linux distribution. Edd is the creator of XMLhack and WriteTheWeb, and has a weblog called Behind the Times.

Bibliographic information