Beverwijck: A Dutch Village on the American Frontier, 1652-1664

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SUNY Press, Sep 25, 2003 - History - 527 pages
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Beverwijck explores the rich history and Dutch heritage of one of North America’s oldest cities—Albany, New York. Drawing on documents translated from the colonial Dutch as well as maps, architectural drawings, and English-language sources, Janny Venema paints a lively picture of everyday life in colonial America.

In 1652, Petrus Stuyvesant, director general of New Netherland, established a court at Fort Orange, on the west side of New York State’s upper Hudson River. The area within three thousand feet of the fort became the village of Beverwijck. From the time of its establishment until 1664, when the English conquered New Netherland and changed the name of the settlement to Albany, Beverwijck underwent rapid development as newly wealthy traders, craftsmen, and other workers built houses, roads, bridges, and a school, as well as a number of inns. A well-organized system of poor relief also helped less wealthy settlers survive in the harsh colonial conditions. Venema’s careful research shows that although Beverwijck resembled villages in the Dutch Republic in many ways, it quickly took on features of the new, “American” society that was already coming into being.
  

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Contents

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Page 30 - Culture' is an imprecise term, with many rival definitions; mine is 'a system of shared meanings, attitudes • and values, and the symbolic forms / (performances, artifacts) in which they are expressed or embodied' . 1 Culture in this sense is part of a total way of life but not identical with it.
Page 501 - ... burghers, and other such like reasons. Upon the complaint of the burghers here, the petitioners find and have daily experienced that the bakers do not act in good faith in the matter of baking bread for the burghers, but bolt the flour from the meal and sell it greatly to their profit to the savages for the baking of sweet cake, white bread, cookies and pretzels, so that the burghers must buy and get largely bran for their money, and even then the bread is frequently found to be short of weight,...

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About the author (2003)

Janny Venema is a Project Associate at the New Netherland Project, which is responsible for translating the official records of the Dutch colony and promoting awareness of the Dutch role in American history.

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