A Separate Place: A Family, a Cabin in the Woods, and a Journey of Love and Spirit

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Penguin Group (USA) Incorporated, 2000 - Biography & Autobiography - 288 pages
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In 1998, David Brill left the stresses and suburban angst of Knoxville and struck out for the pristine Tennessee woods. A Separate Place chronicles his journey to the retreat he created in a 630-square-foot cabin on sixty-eight acres of riverfront wilderness.

Carving out his place in rustic Morgan County, Brill reconnects with nature and returns to a life of greater simplicity. Here, while tending to the nearly overwhelming task of overseeing the clearing of the land and building a home, he lays a foundation for a more fulfilling life, and a deeper relationship with his two daughters. It is also here that he must come to terms with the bittersweet ending of his eighteen-year marriage.

In these candid and moving reflections on nature, work, family, and love, Brill charts his sometimes exhilarating, sometimes painful evolution as a father and as a man. He shares invaluable life lessons -- both humorous and poignant -- from his adventures with the buddies who come to lend moral support to a midlife mountaineering feat with his brother to the difficult process of making peace with his wife in the aftermath of divorce. Honest, insightful, and wise, A Separate Place will resonate with all those who yearn for a sanctuary of their own.

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User Review  - GrinningDwarf - LibraryThing

As a Dad to a daughter, and as someone with a little rock climbing and LOTSA mountain camping experience, this was a great one!! Read full review

Contents

A Suburban Sargasso
13
Spring
25
Summer
87
Copyright

28 other sections not shown

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About the author (2000)

David Brill is an adjunct professor at the University of Tennessee's School of Journalism. His articles have appeared in National Geographic Traveler, Men's Health, Backpacker, Outside, and Parenting magazines. He is the author of As Far as the Eye Can See, a collection of essays based on his experiences on the Appalachian Trail.

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