CharlestonNorth Charleston, SC, Bulletin 309533, September 1998 (Google eBook)

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DIANE Publishing
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Page A-4 - ... cell" level. Responding and nonresponding establishments were classified into these cells according to industry and employment size. Responding and nonresponding occupations within responding establishments were classified into cells that were additionally defined by major occupation group and job level.
Page 1 - The Employment Cost Index, a quarterly measure of the change in employer costs for wages and benefits, is derived from the NCS. Another product, Employer Costs for Employee Compensation, measures employers' average hourly costs for total compensation, that is, wages and benefits.
Page A-1 - Sample design The sample for this survey area was selected using a twostage stratified design with probability proportional to employment sampling at each stage. The first stage of sample selection was a probability sample of establishments. The sample of establishments was drawn by first stratifying the sampling frame by industry and ownership. The number of sample establishments allocated to each stratum is approximately proportional to the stratum employment. Each sampled establishment is selected...
Page 15 - В for more information. 3 Employees are classified as working either a full-time or a part-time schedule based on the definition used by each establishment. Therefore, a worker with a 35-hour-per-week schedule might be considered a full-time employee in one establishment, but classified as part-time in another firm, where a 40-hour week is the minimum full-time schedule. 2 Each occupation for which data are collected in an establishment is evaluated based on 10 factors, including knowledge, complexity,...
Page 4 - Engineers architects and surveyors Mathematical and computer scientists Natural scientists Health related...
Page A-1 - The second stage of sample selection, detailed below, was a probability sample of occupations within a sampled establishment. Data collection The collection of data from survey respondents required detailed procedures. Field economists collected the data, working out of the Regional Office and visiting each establishment surveyed. Other contact methods, such as mail and telephone, were used to follow-up and update data. Occupational selection and classification Identification of the occupations for...
Page A-2 - Special procedures were developed for jobs for which a correct classification or level could not be determined. In step one, the jobs to be sampled were selected at each establishment by the BLS field economist during a personal visit. A complete list of employees was used for sampling, with each selected worker representing a job within the establishment. As with the selection of establishments, the selection of a job was based on probability proportional to its size in the establishment. The greater...
Page A-3 - National Office following collection. Weighting and nonresponse Sample weights were calculated for each establishment and occupation in the survey. These weights reflected the relative size of the occupation within the establishment and of the establishment within the sample universe. Weights were used to aggregate data for the individual establishments or occupations into the various data series. Some of the establishments surveyed could not supply or refused to supply information. If data were...
Page A-1 - Sampling frame The list of establishments from which the survey sample was selected (sampling frame) was developed from State unemployment insurance reports. Due to the volatility of industries within the private sector, sampling frames were developed using the most recent month of reference available at the time the sample was selected. The sampling frame was reviewed prior to the survey and, when necessary, missing establishments were added, out-of-business and out-of-scope establishments were...
Page A-2 - Survey occupational classification system is based on the 1990 Census of Population. A selected job may fall into any one of about 480 occupational classifications, from accountant to wood lathe operator. For cases in which a job's duties overlapped two or more census classification codes, the duties used to set the wage level were used to classify the job. Classification by primary duties was the fallback. Each occupational classification is an element of a broader classification known as a major...

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