America's Musical Life: A History

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W. W. Norton & Company, 2001 - Music - 976 pages
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The fascinating story of music in the United States, from the sacred music of its earliest days to the jazz and rock that enliven the turn of the millennium. Richard Crawford leads us along the widely varied paths taken by American music, beginning with that of Native Americans and continuing with traditions introduced by Spanish, French, and English colonizers; Africans brought here as slaves; and other immigrants. He shows how the three spheres of folk, popular, and classical music continually interact to form a variegated whole. Throughout, the music is set in historical and social context. America's Musical Life strikes a balance in presenting general background and highlighting individual composers, performers, and pieces of music. We learn how sacred music-making coexisted with secular song and dance in the colonies; how nineteenth-century commerce ruled the publication of parlor music; and how the twentieth century introduced an incredibly rich array of styles, encompassing blues, jazz, sound tracks, folk revival, swing, minimalism, rock, and hip-hop, to name just a few, as well as the music of Charles Ives, George Gershwin, Duke Ellington, and Sarah Vaughan--the list is endless. Bringing order to this cacophony, America's Musical Life gives us a highly readable and informative account of this country's rich musical traditions.
  

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America's musical life: a history

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Here, Crawford (Glen McGeoch Collegiate Professor of Music, Univ. of Michigan; former president, American Musicological Society) has assembled a comprehensive tome poised to supersede all previous ... Read full review

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Arguably one of the finest texts of its kind in one volume on the subject of American Music. Mr. Crawford has done a superb job in bringing the quagmire of American Music and where it came from into a manageable volume that whets the appetite for those interest in the Culture and Metamorphosis of music in America. The text covers the cultural/social aspects of music in America beginning with the arrival of the Europeans to modern day events in the American Music Scene. While not exhaustive in any one area, this "introduction" certainly serves as a great launching point from which to begin a more in depth and scholarly study on any pof the myriad subjects mentioned in the book. I have found this book to make an excellent text for a college level class on the survey of American Music. A must read for any one interest in American Music.  

Contents

IV
3
V
15
VI
29
VII
56
VIII
83
IX
102
X
125
XI
137
XXIX
471
XXX
493
XXXII
495
XXXIII
524
XXXIV
557
XXXV
580
XXXVI
597
XXXVII
619

XIII
139
XIV
156
XV
173
XVI
196
XVII
221
XVIII
240
XIX
272
XX
293
XXI
314
XXII
331
XXIII
351
XXIV
372
XXV
387
XXVI
407
XXVII
430
XXVIII
453
XXXVIII
641
XXXIX
664
XL
689
XLI
714
XLII
736
XLIII
755
XLIV
778
XLV
799
XLVI
813
XLVII
837
XLVIII
853
XLIX
861
L
897
LI
925
LII
931
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About the author (2001)

Crawford is Glen McGeoch Collegiate Professor of Music at the University of Michigan and a past president of the American Musicological Society.

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