American Power and the New Mandarins

Front Cover
The New Press, 2002 - History - 404 pages
5 Reviews
Back in print, the seminal work by "arguably the most important intellectual alive" (The New York Times). American Power and the New Mandarins is Noam Chomsky's first political book, widely considered to be among the most cogent and powerful statements against the American war in Vietnam. Long out of print, this collection of early, seminal essays helped to establish Chomsky as a leading critic of United States foreign policy. These pages mount a scathing critique of the contradictions of the war, and an indictment of the mainstream, liberal intellectualsthe "new mandarins"who furnished what Chomsky argued was the necessary ideological cover for the horrors visited on the Vietnamese people. As America's foreign entanglements deepen by the month, Chomsky's lucid analysis is a sobering reminder of the perils of imperial diplomacy. With a new foreword by Howard Zinn, author of A People's History of the United States, American Power and the New Mandarins is a renewed call for independent analysis of America's role in the world.
  

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Review: American Power and the New Mandarins: Historical and Political Essays

User Review  - Mike - Goodreads

Chomsky cuts through the bullshit to expose the hypocritical moral authority our country uses to justify acts of terror and aggression, specifically calling out the complicity of the intellectual ... Read full review

Review: American Power and the New Mandarins: Historical and Political Essays

User Review  - Armen - Goodreads

Chomsky takes apart the idea that the USA is the greatest country in the world - and makes us all better off for having him there to stick a pin in our fantasies about America's influence in the world. Read full review

Contents

Introduction
3
Objectivity and Liberal Scholarship
23
The Logic of Withdrawal
221
A Review
295
Some Thoughts on Intellectuals and the Schools
309
The Responsibility of Intellectuals
323
On Resistance
367
Supplement to On Resistance
387
Epilogue
401
Copyright

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About the author (2002)

Noam Chomsky was born in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania on December 7, 1928. Son of a Russian emigrant who was a Hebrew scholar, Chomsky was exposed at a young age to the study of language and principles of grammar. During the 1940s, he began developing socialist political leanings through his encounters with the New York Jewish intellectual community. Chomsky received his Ph.D. from the University of Pennsylvania, where he studied linguistics, mathematics, and philosophy. He conducted much of his research at Harvard University. In 1955, he began teaching at MIT, eventually holding the Ferrari P. Ward Chair of Modern Language and Linguistics. Today Chomsky is highly regarded as both one of America's most prominent linguists and most notorious social critics and political activists. His academic reputation began with the publication of Syntactic Structures in 1957. Within a decade, he became known as an outspoken intellectual opponent of the Vietnam War. Chomsky has written many books on the links between language, human creativity, and intelligence, including Language and Mind (1967) and Knowledge of Language: Its Nature, Origin, and Use (1985). He also has written dozens of political analyses, including Manufacturing Consent: The Political Economy of the Mass Media (1988), Chronicles of Dissent (1992), and The Prosperous Few and the Restless Many (1993).

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