The Bridge Builder's Story: A Novel

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M.E. Sharpe, Jan 1, 1995 - Fiction - 210 pages
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When Scott Waring married the woman he adored and took off on a European honeymoon in 1939, he felt he had all that life might offer any man. But the honeymoon turned into a nightmare, and Scott Waring was plunged into the central crisis of the 20th century, Germany under the Nazis, the Gestapo, World War Two and the holocaust.

Above all, this is a love story, a story of love that transcends death and time; but it is also a story of the agony of Jews in a Christian world, a story on many levels. And as with every novel by Howard Fast, it is a story that will grip you from the first page to the last, a story of high adventure, of hope and despair and final exultation.

There is no one on the American Literary scene quite like Howard Fast. In the more than 60 years since his first novel was published, he produced a steady flow of novels, history, biography and plays---and earned for himself perhaps the largest readership worldwide of any writer of the 20th century. His work has been translated into 82 languages, including new translations in France, Poland, Hungary, Japan, Holland and Bulgaria.

The Bridge Builder's Story is by our judgment his best novel. As with so many of his books, it cuts to the marrow of our time, the crisis of our civilization, which we call the holocaust. Yet it is not a book about the holocaust. It is a love story, a moving, agonizing love story in which a Christian gentleman, a white Protestant American is forced to confront and deal with a world he never dreamed of or believed could be. From the first to the last page, this book will grasp and hold you. You will journey with Scott Waring into Nazi Germany and in and out of the ultimate horrors of World War Two and then to postwar New York. We believe it is a unique journey and a unique book, and when you finish it, the people you have met will remain with you.

  

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The Bridge Builder's Story

User Review  - Not Available - Book Verdict

Scott Waring and his wife are privileged young Americans, but on their honeymoon trip to Berlin in 1939 they experience deadly Gestapo tactics. Some years later, as an officer in the Army Corps of ... Read full review

Review: The Bridge Builder's Story

User Review  - Janice Reisman - Goodreads

AN ABSOLUTELY BEAUTIFUL STORY ABOUT A VERY YOUNG COUPLE, WHO MARRY AND SPEND THEIR HONEYMOON IN EUROPE IN THE MID 1930'S Read full review

Selected pages

Contents

Section 1
3
Section 2
15
Section 3
27
Section 4
43
Section 5
55
Section 6
67
Section 7
83
Section 8
113
Section 9
133
Section 10
151
Section 11
157
Section 12
169
Section 13
179
Section 14
193
Section 15
205
Copyright

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About the author (1995)

Howard Fast was born January 11, 1914. The grandson of Jewish immigrants from Ukraine, he was raised in a poor family, and his politics have always been an important part of his life and work. A fighter for anti-Fascist causes and a member of the Communist party, he was jailed for three months during the 1950s for refusing to testify about his political activity. Blacklisted as a result, he founded his own publishing house, Blue Heron Press, which released his novel Spartacus (1951), which was made into a popular film in 1960. Some of his works were written under the pseudonym E. V. Cunningham. Fast's first novel was published in 1933 during the Great Depression, and he has had a solidly successful career ever since. Considered to be one of the world's most widely read writers, his books have been translated into 82 languages. More than 10 of his novels have been made into films, and The Immigrants (1977) was made into a television miniseries in 1979. His novels are page-turners, in which characters struggle with personal, political, and religious questions in their lives. The female characters-a number of his books have female protagonists-are strong, intelligent, and capable people who must fight to maintain their families and their fortunes amidst the tumultuous events of the twentieth century. Howard Fast died on March 12, 2003.

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