The United States Constitution: A Graphic Adaptation

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Farrar, Straus and Giroux, Oct 14, 2008 - Comics & Graphic Novels - 149 pages
24 Reviews
Our leaders swear to uphold it, our military to defend it. It is the blueprint for the shape and function of government itself and what defines Americans as Americans. But how many of us truly know our Constitution?

The United States Constitution: A Graphic Adaptation uses the art of illustrated storytelling to breathe life into our nationís cornerstone principles. Simply put, it is the most enjoyable and groundbreaking way to read the governing document of the United States. Spirited and visually witty, it roves article by article, amendment by amendment, to get at the meaning, background, and enduring relevance of the law of the land.

What revolutionary ideas made the Constitutionís authors dare to cast off centuries of rule by kings and queens? Why do we have an electoral college rather than a popular vote for president and vice president? How did a document that once sanctioned slavery, denied voting rights to women, and turned a blind eye to state governments running roughshod over the liberties of minorities transform into a bulwark of protection for all?

The United States Constitution answers all of these questions. Sure to surprise, challenge, and provoke, it is hands down the most memorable introduction to Americaís founding document.

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The research for this book was very well done. - Goodreads
The art work is OK, though at times unoriginal. - Goodreads
The graphics add humor and life. - LibraryThing

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - LaneLiterati - LibraryThing

Likes: This book presents the United States Constitution in an engaging way. The graphics add humor and life. I'd recommend it as a supplement to those teens studying the Constitution in school ... Read full review

User Review - Flag as inappropriate

This is a very useful review for those of us (like me) who have not studied the Constitution since high school (or was it junior high?). The book can also be useful for people studying for citizenship tests and such.
The graphics are sometimes witty and thought-provoking. For example, to explain the right to a speedy trial, the author and artist depict a man driving up to a fast-trial window, modeled on a fast-food window. "Give me a speedy trial, please." "Would you like a change of venue with that, sir?" Droll.
May help you to remember parts of the Constitution or the several amendments that you don't already know.
 

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Contents

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Copyright

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About the author (2008)

A†ten-year veteran of the film and television production industry, JONATHAN HENNESSEY is a writer living in Los Angeles. AARON MCCONNELL is a freelance illustrator living in Oregon.

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