Cengage Advantage Books: Understanding Arguments: An Introduction to Informal Logic

Front Cover
Cengage Learning, Feb 10, 2009 - Philosophy - 576 pages
1 Review
Now in its Eighth Edition, UNDERSTANDING ARGUMENTS: AN INTRODUCTION TO INFORMAL LOGIC, 8th Edition. has proven itself to be an exceptional guide to understanding and constructing arguments in the context of students' academic studies as well as their subsequent professional careers. Its tried and true strengths include multiple approaches to the analysis of arguments; a thorough grounding on the uses of language in everyday discourse; and chapters in the latter half of the book that apply abstract concepts to concrete legal, moral, and scientific issues.
Important Notice: Media content referenced within the product description or the product text may not be available in the ebook version.
  

What people are saying - Write a review

User Review - Flag as inappropriate

I couldn't agree more. Never in my life have I posted a review on anything, however given my sincere frustrations, I feel it is appropriate. I'm a Michigan State student who studies the philosophy of language (#1 communications school in the USA). I graduate in 8 days and this 100 level class is killing me. I know more than what the book offers, and because of these missing holes, I'm not doing very well. Here's an example: The authors cover SPEECH ACT THEORY and they don't include the 5 PERFORMATIVES!! I know Searle and Austin very well and this book does a great injustice to the reader. ahhhhhhh so frustrated....  

Contents

How to Analyze Arguments
1
How to Evaluate Arguments Deductive Standards
139
How to Evaluate Arguments Inductive Standards
213
Fallacies
315
Areas of Argumentation
401
CREDITS
543
INDEX
545
Copyright

Common terms and phrases

About the author (2009)

Walter Sinnott-Armstrong is Chauncey Stillman Professor of Practical Ethics in the Department of Philosophy and the Kenan Institute for Ethics at Duke University.

Robert J. Fogelin is Professor of Philosophy and Sherman Fairchild Professor in the Humanities at Dartmouth College.

Bibliographic information