Rural Rides: In the Counties of Surrey, Kent, Sussex, Hants, Berks, Oxford, Bucks, Wilts, Somerset, Gloucester, Hereford, Salop, Worcester,j Stafford, Leicester, Hertford, Essex, Suffolk, Norfolk, Cambridge, Huntington, Nottingham, Lincoln, York, Lancaster, Durham, and Northumberland, During the Years 1821 to 1832, with Economical and Political Observations, Volume 2 (Google eBook)

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Reeves and Turner, 1885 - England
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Page 85 - Hear this, O ye that swallow up the needy, Even to make the poor of the land to fail, Saying, When will the new moon be gone, that we may sell corn? And the sabbath, that we may set forth wheat, Making the ephah small, and the shekel great, And falsifying the balances by deceit? That we may buy the poor for silver, And the needy for a pair of shoes ; Yea, and sell the refuse of the wheat?
Page 292 - There is abundant authority for saying that Christianity is part and parcel of the law of the land...
Page 205 - WITH regard likewise to animals ferae naturae, all mankind had by the original grant of the creator a right to pursue and take any fowl or insect of the air, any fish or inhabitant of the waters, and any beast or reptile of the field : and this natural right still continues in every individual, unless where it is restrained by the civil laws of the country.
Page 205 - All these things, so long as they remain in possession, every man has a right to enjoy without disturbance ; but if once they escape from his custody, or he voluntarily abandons the use of them, they return to the common stock, and any man else has an equal right to seize and enjoy them afterwards.
Page 163 - «country gentlemen? The last to bid the cry of warfare cease, The first to make a malady of peace. For what were all these country patriots born? To hunt, and vote, and raise the price of corn? But corn, like every mortal thing, must fall, Kings, conquerors, and markets most of all.
Page 57 - ... it seemed to me, that one way of exposing this mixture of madness and of blasphemy was, to take a look, now that the harvest is in, at the produce, the mouths, the condition, and the changes that have taken place, in a spot like this, which God has favoured with every good that he has had to bestow upon man.
Page 55 - Milston ; and at the end of about a mile, from the top of a very high part of the down, with a steep slope towards the valley, I first saw this Valley of Avon ; and a most beautiful sight it was ! Villages, hamlets, large farms, towers, steeples, fields, meadows, orchards, and very fine timber trees, scattered all over the valley.
Page 207 - Law, now arrived to, and wantoning in, its highest vigour : both founded upon the same unreasonable notions of permanent property in wild creatures; and both productive of the same tyranny to the commons : but with this difference ; that the Forest Laws established only one mighty hunter throughout the land, the Game Laws have raised a little Nimrod in every manor.
Page 242 - expelled: the cottages and the churches were burnt: and " more than thirty square miles, of a rich and populous district "were withdrawn from cultivation and converted into a wil"derness, to afford suff1cient range for the deer, and ample "space for the royal diversion.
Page 296 - They are all painted or washed white ; the sails are black ; it was a fine morning, the wind was brisk, and their twirling altogether, added greatly to the beauty of the scene, which, having the broad and beautiful arm of the sea on the one hand, and the fields and meadows, studded with farmhouses, on the other, appeared to me the most beautiful sight of the kind that I had ever beheld3.