Inside Facts on Pugilism (Google eBook)

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Laird & Lee, 1907 - Boxing - 192 pages
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Siler offers a rare insight into the middling days of boxing. His humor and intimate familiarity with the culture make the book a unique read. The veracity of some of his stories may be doubted, as all interactions involving Siler himself are decidedly slanted in his own favor. With that said, Siler paints an entertaining picture of himself as a cool, sharp referee whose methods (in any capacity) are far superior to any others. The tales he offers of his and others' experiences are laced with jargon and dialects that make one appreciate the atmosphere of the time. The later portion of the book chronicles historical fights and loses much of the voice that makes the earlier chunk so compelling. The historical relevance of these chapters to the sport is likely important, but as a matter of taste, Siler's own intriguing, nonfictional narrative fizzles out into a journalistic play-by-play. With that said, I wholly recommend reading the first seventy-five percent of the book -- plus the treat that is Siler's version of a glossary, which insists on defining terms like, "skied the towel" and "going around him like a cooper goes around a barrel." 

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Page 18 - The rounds to be of three minutes duration, and one minute time between rounds. 4. If either man fall, through weakness or otherwise, he must get up unassisted; ten seconds to be allowed him to do so, the other man meanwhile to return to his corner, and when the fallen man is on his legs the round is to be resumed and continued until the three minutes have expired. If one man fails to come to the scratch in the ten seconds allowed, it shall be in the power of the referee to give his award in favor...
Page 16 - If one man fails to come to the scratch in the ten seconds allowed, it shall be in the power of the referee to give his award in favor of the other man. Rule 5. A man hanging on the ropes in a helpless state, with his toes off the ground, shall be considered down.
Page 17 - ... be allowed in the ring during the rounds. Rule 7. Should the contest be stopped by any unavoidable interference, the referee to name the time and place as soon as possible for finishing the contest; so that the match must be won and lost, unless the backers of both men agree to draw the stakes. Rule 8. The gloves to be fair-sized boxing gloves of the best quality and new. Rule 9. Should a glove burst, or come off, it must be replaced to the referee's satisfaction. Rule 10. A man on one knee is...
Page 17 - No seconds or any other person to be allowed in the ring during the rounds. 7. Should the contest be stopped by any unavoidable interference, the referee to name time and place, as soon as possible, for finishing the contest ; so that the match must be won and lost, unless the backers of both men agree to draw the stakes. 8. The gloves to be fair-sized boxing gloves of the best quality, and new. 9. Should a glove burst, or come off, it must be replaced to the referee's satisfaction. 10. A man on...
Page 19 - ... the three minutes have expired. If one man fails to come to the scratch in the ten seconds allowed, it shall be in the power of the referee to give his award in favor of the other man. 5. A man hanging on the ropes in a helpless state, with his toes off the ground, shall be considered down.
Page 16 - To be a fair stand-up boxing match in a twentyfour-foot ring, or as near that size as practicable. 2. No wrestling or hugging allowed. 3. The rounds to be of three minutes' duration, and one minute time between rounds. 4. If either man fall, through weakness or otherwise, he must get up unassisted, ten seconds to be allowed him to do so, the other man meanwhile to return to his corner, and when the fallen man is on his legs the round...
Page 94 - If he canot get that he will stipulate the money be divided, 75 per cent to the winner and 25 per cent to the loser...
Page 108 - ... referee, was loaded down with blue hardware and just dying for an opportunity to pull it and blaze away.
Page 19 - ... referee to declare his opponent the winner. No seconds or any other person to be allowed in the ring during the rounds; should the contest be stopped by any unavoidable interference, the referee to name time and place for finishing the contest as soon as possible; the match must be fought to a finish, unless the backers of both men agree to draw the stakes.
Page 168 - Corbett opened the third round with a stiff punch in the stomach, and threw his head down so as to avoid Fitz's left swing and clinched.

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