Dark Sweat, White Gold: California Farm Workers, Cotton, and the New Deal (Google eBook)

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University of California Press, Nov 8, 1994 - Business & Economics - 338 pages
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In her incisive analysis of the shaping of California's agricultural work force, Devra Weber shows how the cultural background of Mexican and, later, Anglo-American workers, combined with the structure of capitalist cotton production and New Deal politics, forging a new form of labor relations. She pays particular attention to Mexican field workers and their organized struggles, including the famous strikes of 1933. Weber's perceptive examination of the relationships between economic structure, human agency, and the state, as well as her discussions of the crucial role of women in both Mexican and Anglo working-class life, make her book a valuable contribution to labor, agriculture, Chicano, Mexican, and California history.
  

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Contents

We are producing a product to sell The Business of Cotton
17
Sin Fronteras Mexican Workers
48
As the faulting of the earth The Strike of 1933
79
The Mixed Promise of the New Deal
112
New Migrants in the Fields
137
New Deal Relief Policies Local Organizing and Electoral Battles
162
End of a Hope The Strikes of 1938 and 1939
180
Down the valleys wild Conclusion
200
Tables
211
Proposal of the Associated Farmers
223
Notes
225
Bibliography
297
Index
329
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About the author (1994)

Devra Weber is Assistant Professor of History at the University of California, Riverside.

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