We Never Talk about My Brother

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Tachyon Publications, Mar 15, 2009 - Fiction - 219 pages
24 Reviews
Modern parables of love, death, and transformation are peppered with melancholy in this extraordinary collection of contemporary fantasy. Each short story cultivates a whimsical sense of imagination and reveals a mature, darker voice than previously experienced from this legendary author. In one tale the Angel of Death enjoys newfound celebrity while moonlighting as an anchorman on the network news, while in another the shortsighted ruler of a gentle realm betrays himself in dreaming of a "manageable war." Further storylines include an American librarian who discovers that, much to his surprise and sadness, he is the last living Frenchman, and rivals in a supernatural battle who decide to forgo pistols at dawn, choosing instead to duel with dramatic recitations of terrible poetry. Featuring several previously unpublished stories alongside a bevy of recently released works, this haunting compilation is appealing to both genre readers and mainstream literature lovers.

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LibraryThing Review

User Review  - CSRodgers - LibraryThing

Just wasn't in the mood this time. Even back when I read The Last Unicorn and A Fine and Private Place, I had to get myself past Beagle's jokey class clown style narrator to appreciate his stuff, but ... Read full review

Review: We Never Talk about My Brother

User Review  - Rebecca - Goodreads

I admit, I knew before I read it that I was going to love this book - I've adored everything Peter Beagle has ever written. That said, even trying to keep my mind as open as I could (no author is ... Read full review

Contents

The Tale of Junko and Sayuri
61
King Pelles the Sure
95
The Last and Only
107
Copyright

5 other sections not shown

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About the author (2009)

Peter S. Beagle is the author of A Fine and Private Place, The Innkeeper’s Song, The Last Unicorn, The Rhinoceros Who Quoted Nietzsche, and Tamsin. He wrote the screenplays for the animated feature-film versions of The Last Unicorn and The Lord of the Rings, and is the recipient of the Mythopoeic Fantasy Award, a Hugo, and a Nebula Award. He lives in Oakland, California.

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