The Centennial History of Oregon, 1811-1912, Volume 4 (Google eBook)

Front Cover
S.J. Clarke Publishing Company, 1912 - Oregon
0 Reviews
  

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 6 - He was a man of keen sagacity, capable of looking beyond the exigencies of the moment to the possibilities of the future.
Page 399 - Short votes with the democratic party and keeps well informed on the questions and issues of the day but has never been a politician in the sense of office seeking.
Page 195 - ... possessed of an analytical mind and a self-control that will enable him to lose his individuality, his personal feelings, his prejudices and his peculiarities...
Page 86 - The specific and distinctive office of biography is not to give voice to a man's modest estimate of himself and his accomplishments, but rather to leave the perpetual record establishing his character by the consensus of opinion on the part of his fellowmen.
Page 595 - THERE is no flock, however watched and tended, But one dead lamb is there ! There is no fireside, howsoe'er defended, But has one vacant chair ! The air is full of farewells to the dying, And mournings for the dead; The heart of Rachel, for her children crying, Will not be comforted...
Page 453 - Rite, and of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, the Knights of Pythias and the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks.
Page 39 - He is past master of his lodge and past high priest of the chapter.
Page 78 - He votes with the republican party and keeps well informed on the questions and issues of the day but is not ambitious for office.
Page 90 - Jacobus exercises his right of franchise in support of the men and measures of the republican party and keeps well informed on the questions and issues of the day. He...
Page 138 - He is at home in all departments of the law, from the minutiae in practice to the greater topics wherein is involved the consideration of the ethics and the philosophy of jurisprudence and the higher concerns of public policy.

Bibliographic information