Whatever Happened to the Hall of Fame (Google eBook)

Front Cover
Simon and Schuster, Apr 6, 1995 - Sports & Recreation - 464 pages
14 Reviews
Arguing about the merits of players is the baseball fan's second favorite pastime and every year the Hall of Fame elections spark heated controversy. In a book that's sure to thrill--and infuriate--countless fans, Bill James takes a hard look at the Hall, probing its history, its politics and, most of all, its decisions.
  

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Review: Whatever Happened to the Hall of Fame

User Review  - Gary Geiger - Goodreads

This is a good book that is marred by the fact that it has changed the way we view baseball history in a deletrious matter. It looks at Hall of Fame cases for various players using traditional stats ... Read full review

Review: Whatever Happened to the Hall of Fame

User Review  - Randal - Goodreads

Not James' liveliest book, it is still as persuasive and as painstakingly researched as anything James writes. His forte is less statistics than the ability to put statistics into context. So the next ... Read full review

Contents

558
3
Acknowledgments
9
Cacophony and Confusion
27
Institutional Hist0rythe Hall of Fame in
39
and 19505
47
Scooter
54
MethodsIntroduction and lustification
67
Drysdale and Pappas
77
Gordon and Doerr
139
Institutional Historythe Hall of Fame in
145
Hall of Fame Standards
172
The Negro Leaguers
187
Tinker and Davis
193
Priddy and Rizzuto
219
The Time Line
231
Overview
243

Similarity Scores
88
Myer and Herman
108
Arguments
119

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Page 11 - Bill Mazeroski should be in the Hall of Fame. One reason is that as he was leaving the church on his wedding day, with his bride on his arm, he put a plug of tobacco in his cheek. The other sufficient reason is his defensive play.

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About the author (1995)

Bill James made his mark in the 1970s and 1980s with his Baseball Abstracts. He has been tearing down preconceived notions about America's national pastime ever since. He is currently the Senior Advisor on Baseball Operations for the Boston Red Sox. James lives in Lawrence, Kansas, with his wife, Susan McCarthy, and three children.

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