Gargantua and Pantagruel (Google eBook)

Front Cover
Digireads.com Publishing, Jan 1, 2004 - Fiction
42 Reviews
An elaborate parody written in the 16th century, "Gargantua and Pantagruel" is a comic blend of energetic realism and carnival fantasy. The two main characters are giants, a father and his son, who have numerous adventures. Many different types of people are satirized during their chivalric exploits, from lawyers to theologians, generals to monarchs, with humor that is often grotesque or obscene. Intertwined with this crude comedy, however, is the wisdom of Renaissance learning, which exposes countless examples of human foolishness. Divided into two volumes, one describes a sullied giant who grows into a grand knight and prince, and the other portrays his erudite son who himself becomes a Renaissance Socrates. Rabelais' work is full of freedom and laughter, as well as a certain understanding that will give readers a renewed worldview.
  

What people are saying - Write a review

User ratings

5 stars
19
4 stars
11
3 stars
5
2 stars
3
1 star
4

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - stillatim - LibraryThing

Imagine that the world insisted that Dante's Comedy, the Vita Nuova, the writings on Monarchy, his book about using Italian instead of Latin, and some random thing written by someone claiming to be ... Read full review

Review: Great Books of the Western World

User Review  - Garrett Starr - Goodreads

I have always wanted this collection, but over the years I purchased other books instead. When our church moved into our current digs, this entire collection was hidden away in a back room and covered ... Read full review

Contents

How Pantagruel went ashore at the dwelling of Gaster the first master of arts in the world p
398
How at the court of the master of ingenuity Pantagruel detested the Engastrimythes and the Gastrolaters p
400
Of the ridiculous statue Manduce and how and what the Gastrolaters sacrifice to their ventripotent god p
401
What the Gastrolaters sacrificed to their god on interlarded fishdays p
404
How Gaster invented means to get and preserve corn p
408
How Gaster invented an art to avoid being hurt or touched by cannon balls p
409
How Pantagruel fell asleep near the island of Chaneph and of the problems proposed to be solved when he waked p
411
How Pantagruel gave no answer to the problems p
412

How they apparelled Gargantua p
27
The colours and liveries of Gargantua p
29
Of that which is signified by the colours white and blue p
30
Of the youthful age of Gargantua p
32
Of Gargantuas wooden horses p
34
How Gargantuas wonderful understanding became known to his father Grangousier by the invention of a torchecul or wipebreech p
35
How Gargantua was taught Latin by a Sophister p
38
How Gargantua was put under other schoolmasters p
39
How Gargantua was sent to Paris and of the huge great mare that he rode on how she destroyed the oxflies of the Beauce p
40
How Gargantua paid his welcome to the Parisians and how he took away the great bells of Our Ladys Church p
41
How Janotus de Bragmardo was sent to Gargantua to recover the great bells p
42
How the Sophister carried away his cloth and how he had a suit in law against the other masters p
43
The study of Gargantua according to the discipline of his schoolmasters the Sophisters p
45
The games of Gargantua p
46
How Gargantua was instructed by Ponocrates and in such sort disciplinated that he lost not one hour of the day p
51
How Gargantua spent his time in rainy weather p
55
How there was great strife and debate raised betwixt the cakebakers of Lerne and those of Gargantuas country whereupon were waged great wars p
56
How the inhabitants of Lerne by the commandment of Picrochole their king assaulted the shepherds of Gargantua unexpectedly and on a sudden p
58
How a monk of Seville saved the close of the abbey from being ransacked by the enemy p
59
How Picrochole stormed and took by assault the rock Clermond and of Grangousiers unwillingness and aversion from the undertaking of war p
62
Pantagruels discourse of the decease of heroic souls and of the dreadful prodigies that happened before the death of the late Lord de Langey p
357
How Pantagruel related a very sad story of the death of the heroes p
359
How Pantagruel sailed by the Sneaking Island where Shrovetide reigned p
360
How Shrovetide is anatomized and described by Xenomanes p
361
Shrovetides outward parts anatomized p
363
A continuation of Shrovetides countenance p
364
How Pantagruel discovered a monstrous physeter or whirlpool near the Wild Island p
366
How the monstrous physeter was slain by Pantagruel p
367
How Pantagruel went on shore in the Wild Island the ancient abode of the Chitterlings p
368
How the wild Chitterlings laid an ambuscado for Pantagruel p
369
How Pantagruel sent for Colonel Maulchitterling and Colonel Cutpudding with a discourse well worth your hearing about the names of places and pe...
371
How Chitterlings are not to be slighted by men p
373
How Friar John joined with the cooks to fight the Chitterlings p
374
How Friar John fitted up the sow and of the valiant cooks that went into it p
375
How Pantagruel broke the Chitterlings at the knees p
377
How Pantagruel held a treaty with Niphleseth Queen of the Chitterlings p
378
How Pantagruel went into the island of Ruach p
379
How small rain lays a high wind p
380
How Pantagruel went ashore in the island of PopeFigland p
381
How a junior devil was fooled by a husbandman of PopeFigland p
383
How the devil was deceived by an old woman of PopeFigland p
384
How Pantagruel went ashore at the island of Papimany p
385
How Homenas Bishop of Papimany showed us the Uranopet decretals p
387
How Homenas showed us the archetype or representation of a pope p
388
Tabletalk in praise of the decretals p
389
A continuation of the miracles caused by the decretals p
391
How by the virtue of the decretals gold is subtilely drawn out of France to Rome p
393
How Homenas gave Pantagruel some bonChristian pears p
395
How Pantagruel being at sea heard various unfrozen words p
396
How among the frozen words Pantagruel found some odd ones p
397
How Pantagruel passed the time with his servants p
416
How by Pantagruels order the Muses were saluted near the isle of Ganabim p
417
How Panurge berayed himself for fear and of the huge cat Rodilardus which he took for a puny devil p
418
Prologue to the Fifth Book p
421
How Pantagruel arrived at the Ringing Island and of the noise that we heard p
424
How the Ringing Island had been inhabited by the Siticines who were become birds p
425
How there is but one popehawk in the Ringing Island p
426
How the birds of the Ringing Island were all passengers p
427
Of the dumb Knighthawks of the Ringing Island p
429
How the birds are crammed in the Ringing Island p
430
How Pantagruel came to the island of the Apedefers or Ignoramuses with long claws and crooked paws and of terrible adventures and monsters there...
431
How Panurge related to Master Aedituus the fable of the horse and the ass p
434
How with much ado we got a sight of the popehawk p
437
How we arrived at the island of Tools p
438
How Pantagruel arrived at the island of Sharping p
439
How we passed through the wicket inhabited by Gripemenall Archduke of the Furred Lawcats p
440
How Gripemenall propounded a riddle to us p
442
How Panurge solved Gripemenalls riddle p
444
How the Furred Lawcats live on corruption p
445
How Friar John talks of rooting out the Furred Lawcats p
446
How we went forwards and how Panurge had like to have been killed p
448
How our ships were stranded and we were relieved by some people that were subject to Queen Whims qui tenoient de la Quinte p
449
How we arrived at the queendom of Whims or Entelechy p
451
How the Quintessence cured the sick with a song p
453
How the Queen passed her time after dinner p
455
How Queen Whims officers were employed and how the said lady retained us among her abstractors p
457
How the Queen was served at dinner and of her way of eating p
458
How there was a ball in the manner of a tournament at which Queen Whims was present p
459
How the thirtytwo persons at the ball fought p
461
How we came to the island of Odes where the ways go up and down p
464
How we came to the island of Sandals and of the order of Semiquaver Friars p
465
How Panurge asked a Semiquaver Friar many questions and was only answered in monosyllables p
468
How Epistemon disliked the institution of Lent p
471
How we came to the land of Satin p
472
How in the land of Satin we saw Hearsay who kept a school of vouching p
475
How we came in sight of Lanternland p
477
How we arrived at the Oracle of the Bottle p
478
How we went underground to come to the Temple of the Holy Bottle and how Chinon is the oldest city in the world p
480
How we went down the tetradic steps and of Panurges fear p
481
How the temple gates in a wonderful manner opened of themselves p
482
Of the Temples admirable pavement p
483
How we saw Bacchuss army drawn up in battalia in mosaic work p
484
How the battle in which the good Bacchus overthrew the Indians was represented in mosaic work p
485
How the temple was illuminated with a wonderful lamp p
486
How the Priestess Bacbuc showed us a fantastic fountain in the temple p
487
How the Priestess Bacbuc equipped Panurge in order to have the word of the Bottle p
491
How Bacbuc the highpriestess brought Panurge before the Holy Bottle p
492
How Panurge and the rest rhymed with poetic fury p
494
How we took our leave of Bacbuc and left the Oracle of the Holy Bottle p
496
Copyright

Common terms and phrases

About the author (2004)

One of the leading humanist writers of the French Renaissance, Rabelais was at first a Franciscan and then a Benedictine monk, a celebrated physician and professor of anatomy, and later cure of Meudon. The works of Rabelais are filled with life to the overflowing, hence the term "Rabelaisian." His principal protagonists, Gargantua and his son, Pantagruel, are appropriately giants, not only in size, but also in spirit and action. The five books of their adventures are separate works, containing, in different measure, adventures, discussions, farcical scenes, jokes, games, satires, philosophical commentaries, and anything else that a worldly, learned man of genius such as Rabelais could pour into his work. His style is innovative and idiosyncratic, marked by humorous neologisms made up from the learned languages, Greek and Latin, side by side with the most earthy, humble, and rough words of the street and barnyard. His Gargantua, published in 1534, satirizes the traditional education of Parisian theologians and, in the Abbe de Theleme episode, recommends a free, hedonistic society of handsome young men and women in contrast to the restrictive life of monasticism. The gigantic scope of Rabelais's work also reflects the Renaissance thirst for encyclopedic knowledge.

Bibliographic information