Global Auteurs: Politics in the Films of Almodóvar, Von Trier, and Winterbottom

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Peter Lang, Jan 1, 2009 - Performing Arts - 252 pages
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Global Auteurs employs auteur theory to examine the work of three contemporary and innovative directors: Pedro Almodovar, Lars von Trier, and Michael Winterbottom. With extensive background information on the global film industry, and on auteur theory and its implications for ideological critique, this book's insightful case studies examine both ideologies the filmmakers re-circulate and ideologies that they confront in textual form. The discussion of Pedro Almodovar devotes particular attention to mass mediation, the family, and gender in the corpus of his films, while Lars von Trier's corpus is interpreted as driven by a motif that characterizes all of his films: the «failed idealist. Michael Winterbottom's body of work presents a genre-diverse, post-MTV style concerned with «outsiders and taboo, representation and truth, and human rights. Global Auteurs' sophisticated approach to decoding film is suitable for graduate and undergraduate courses on film, global mass media, and contemporary Europe.
  

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Contents

Introduction
1
The International Film Industry
11
The Auteur Theory
39
It Was Almost Impossible to Dream That
61
A Dedication
81
Three Films in CloseUp
103
Agent ProvocAuteur
117
Old WorldNew World
145
Lost Without Him
169
Real Art
191
Rights and Wrongs
205
Afterword
219
References
231
Index
243
Copyright

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About the author (2009)

The Author: Brian Michael Goss is Associate Professor in the Department of English and Communication at Saint Louis University in Madrid, Spain. He has a Ph.D. from the Institute of Communications Research at the University of Illinois. His work has been published in numerous journals including the Journal of Communication Inquiry, Journalism and Communication Monographs, Cultural Studies: A Research Annual, Popular Communication, Journalism Studies, and Southern Review.

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