Identity and the Life Cycle, Volume 1

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W. W. Norton & Company, 1980 - Psychology - 191 pages
6 Reviews
This book collects three early papers that—along with Childhood and Society—many consider the best introduction to Erikson's theories.

"Ego Development and Historical Change" is a selection of extensive notes in which Erikson first undertook to relate to each other observations on groups studied on field trips and on children studied longitudinally and clinically. These notes are representative of the source material used for Childhood and Society.

"Growth and Crises of the Health Personality" takes Erikson beyond adolescence, into the critical stages of the whole life cycle.

In the third and last essay, Erikson deals with "The Problem of Ego Identity" successively from biographical, clinical, and social points of view—all dimensions later pursued separately in his work.
  

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Review: Identity and the Life Cycle

User Review  - Karen Floyd - Goodreads

I found this difficult to read but worth it. The writing was dense and I had to go back and re-read sections to understand them, and even get out the dictionary. All, those psychological terms! There ... Read full review

Review: Identity and the Life Cycle

User Review  - Catherine Woodman - Goodreads

the classic text on the eight stages of man, which I use every week in the teaching of residents Read full review

Contents

Prefaces
7
Ego Development and Historical Change
17
Growth and Crises of the Healthy
51
The Problem of Ego Identity
108
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About the author (1980)

Erik H. Erikson, a German-born American psychologist and psychoanalyst, developed theories about the sequence of human development that have had an impact on clinical psychoanalysis, ethics, history, literature, child care, and the emerging interdisciplinary study of the life course. Erikson was an art student, but after undergoing psychoanalysis by Anna Freud in Vienna in 1927, he turned to the field of psychology. According to Erikson's life-cycle theory, first published in Childhood and Society (1950), there are eight developmental stages, which are biologically determined but environmentally shaped: infancy, early childhood, play age, school age, adolescence, young adulthood, mature adulthood, and old age. Each of these stages is associated with a particular crisis that the individual must successfully resolve in order to proceed normally to the next stage-for example, identity versus confusion in adolescence. The concept of the identity crisis is now firmly embedded in psychiatric theory. Erikson also studied the relationship between a person's life and the times in which he or she lives; and his historical-biographical studies of Luther and Gandhi are outstanding products of this inquiry. Erikson taught at Harvard University for 30 years

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