Half the Sky: Turning Oppression Into Opportunity for Women Worldwide

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Vintage Books, 2010 - Political Science - 296 pages
2107 Reviews
#1 National Bestseller

From two of our most fiercely moral voices, a passionate call to arms against our era's most pervasive human rights violation: the oppression of women and girls in the developing world.

With Pulitzer Prize winners Nicholas D. Kristof and Sheryl WuDunn as our guides, we undertake an odyssey through Africa and Asia to meet the extraordinary women struggling there, among them a Cambodian teenager sold into sex slavery and an Ethiopian woman who suffered devastating injuries in childbirth. Drawing on the breadth of their combined reporting experience, Kristof and WuDunn depict our world with anger, sadness, clarity, and, ultimately, hope.

They show how a little help can transform the lives of women and girls abroad. That Cambodian girl eventually escaped from her brothel and, with assistance from an aid group, built a thriving retail business that supports her family. The Ethiopian woman had her injuries repaired and in time became a surgeon. A Zimbabwean mother of five, counseled to return to school, earned her doctorate and became an expert on AIDS.

Through these stories, Kristof and WuDunn help us see that the key to economic progress lies in unleashing women's potential. They make clear how so many people have helped to do just that, and how we can each do our part. Throughout much of the world, the greatest unexploited economic resource is the female half of the population. Countries such as China have prospered precisely because they emancipated women and brought them into the formal economy. Unleashing that process globally is not only the right thing to do; it's also the best strategy for fighting poverty.

Deeply felt, pragmatic, and inspirational, Half the Sky is essential reading for every global citizen.
  

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It's well researched and structured. - Goodreads
It is difficult to read, but please stick with it. - Goodreads
The pictures were outstanding too. - Goodreads
In general, the writing was clear and easy to follow. - Goodreads
It was also incredibly difficult to read. - Goodreads

Review: Half the Sky: Turning Oppression into Opportunity for Women Worldwide

User Review  - Ellen - Goodreads

It's hard to know what to say about this book. It's hard to read at times, especially knowing that these are true stories and really happened, but an important topic. While I don't necessarily agree ... Read full review

Review: Half the Sky: Turning Oppression into Opportunity for Women Worldwide

User Review  - Leslie - Goodreads

This book should be required reading for everyone. Yes at times it can be slightly preachy but the valuable information by far trumps any preachiness. Read full review

All 6 reviews »

Contents

H A PT F R o N E EmancipatingTwentyFirstCentury Slaves
3
A CARE Package for Goretti 19
19
H A Pl E R 1 w 0 Prohibition and Prostitution 2 3
35
The New Abolitionists 5 4
54
Mukhtars School 7 0
70
H A Pl E R SIX Maternal MortalityOne Woman a Minute 9 3
103
Ednas Hospital 1 2 3
123
H A PTE R E l G H I Family Planning and the God Gulf I 3 I
146
CHAPTER TWELVE The Axis ofEquality
205
cu A PTE R TH l RTE E N Grassroots vs Treetops
221
Organizations Supporting Women 2 5 5
255
8 I
271
Copyright

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About the author (2010)

Nicholas D. Kristof and Sheryl WuDunn, are the first married couple to win a Pulitzer Prize in journalism for their coverage of China as New York Times correspondents. They received the 2009 Dayton Literary Peace Prize for Lifetime Achievement and many other prizes including the George Polk and Overseas Press Club awards.
 
Mr. Kristof won a second Pulitzer in 2006, for "his graphic, deeply reported columns that, at personal risk, focused attention on genocide in Darfur." He has also served as bureau chief in Hong Kong, Beijing, and Tokyo, and as associate managing editor.

Ms. WuDunn, now a business executive, worked at The New York Times, on both the business and news sides. She has been a foreign correspondent in Asia, a business editor and a television anchor. She is the first Asian-American to receive a Pulitzer Prize.
 
They live near New York City.


From the Trade Paperback edition.

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