The garden of secrets

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Serpent's Tail, Aug 17, 2000 - Fiction - 152 pages
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"This work deserves the highest recognition . . . no-one can deny Juan Goytisolo is the main Spanish novelist on active service."-Carlos Fuentes "A beautifully written metaphor for what it means to seek out the truth in a world often dominated by lies . . . this author, now 70 years of age, is one of the most brilliant of living writers."-"The Los Angeles Times" Twenty-eight storytellers-one for each letter in the Arabic alphabet-meet in a garden to tell the story of a poet, Eusebio, arrested in the early days of the Spanish Civil War. Eusebio, a friend of GarcA-a Lorca and his circle, had escaped assassination and fled to North Africa. Born in Barcelona, Juan Goytisolo left Spain in hatred of Franco. He now lives in Marrakesh, Morocco.

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GARDEN OF SECRETS

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At the onset of the Spanish Civil War, a young poet named Eusebio is interned at the request of his family in the military psychiatric center in the Spanish city Melilla, on the Mediterranean coast of ... Read full review

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I have never had this problem in which I could not find this book. I look at the DC public library; Kramer Books; Politics & Prose; Books A Million; and Kindle. It is available on Amazon, but even ... Read full review

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Contents

Section 1
3
Section 2
7
Section 3
11
Copyright

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About the author (2000)

Goytisolo first became known in the United States for his novel The Young Assassins (1954), the story of juvenile delinquents corrupted by social conditions during and immediately after the Spanish civil war. His depictions of the spiritual emptiness and moral decay of Spain under the Franco regime led to the censorship of some of his works there, and he moved to Paris in 1957. In 1966 he published Marks of Identity, which would eventually form a trilogy with Count Julian (1970) and Juan the Landless (1975). Count Julian is an exile's view of Spain, with Spanish history, literature, and language derisively viewed for the purpose of destroying them so that they might be reinvented. Formally, it is a "new novel" along the lines of Robbe-Grillet's formulations. Makbara (1980), a misogynous novel, also attacks capitalism. Landscapes after the Battle (1982), based loosely on the life of Lewis Carroll is, in fact, a self-conscious novel concerned mainly with the problems involved in writing novels.

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