Merry's Museum (Google eBook)

Front Cover
Horace B. Fuller, 1871
0 Reviews
  

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 50 - Twill soon be Winter now. Robin, Robin Redbreast, O Robin dear! And what will this poor Robin do? For pinching days are near. The fireside for the cricket, The wheat-stack for the mouse, When trembling night-winds whistle And moan all round the house. The frosty ways like iron, The branches plumed with snow, Alas! in Winter dead and dark, Where can poor Robin go? Robin, Robin Redbreast, O Robin dear! And a crumb of bread for Robin, His little heart to cheer!
Page 145 - Three hundred souls the steamer's freight Crowd forward wild with fear, While at the stern the dreadful flames Above the deck appear. John Maynard watched the nearing flames, But still, with steady hand He grasped the wheel, and steadfastly He steered the ship to land. "John Maynard...
Page 146 - They scorch his hands and brow ; One arm disabled seeks his side : Ah, he is conquered now ! But no ; his teeth are firmly set, He crushes down his pain ; His knee upon the stanchion pressed, He guides the ship again.
Page 144 - WAS on Lake Erie's broad expanse, -*- One bright midsummer day, The gallant steamer Ocean Queen. Swept proudly on her way. Bright faces clustered on the deck, Or^ leaning o'er the side, Watched carelessly the feathery foam That flecked the rippling tide.
Page 98 - How she hangs labels all over him, to testify her disgust at his existence, and to admonish others to beware of his example! How she loosens all his joints, sends tremors along his muscles, and bends forward his frame, as if to bring him upon all-fours with kindred brutes, or to degrade him to the reptile's crawling ! How she disfigures his countenance^ as if intent upon obliterating all traces of her own image, so that she may swear she never made him ! How she pours rheum over his eyes, sends foul...
Page 98 - As he drains the cup of life, there are no lees at the bottom. His organs will reach the goal of existence together. Painlessly as a candle burns down in its socket, so will he expire ; and a little imagination would convert him into another Enoch, translated from earth to a better world without the sting of death. But look at an opposite extreme, where an opposite history is recorded. What wreck so shocking to behold as the wreck of a dissolute man ; the vigor of life exhausted, and yet the...
Page 156 - A gentleman who saw this great work says that " such was the speed with which a tree of the largest size passed any given point, that he could only strike it once with a stick as it rushed by, however quickly he attempted to repeat the blow.
Page 145 - John Maynard watched the nearing flames, But still with steady hand He grasped the wheel, and steadfastly He steered the ship to land. "John Maynard, can you still hold out?" He heard the captain cry; A voice from out the stifling smoke Faintly responds, "Ay! ay!
Page 145 - Three hundred souls, the steamer's freight, Crowd forward, wild with fear, While at the stern the dreadful flames Above the deck appear. 7. John Maynard watched' the nearing flames, But still, with steady hand, He grasped the wheel, and steadfastly He steered the ship to land. "John Maynard, can you still hold out?
Page 194 - Oh, mother," said the dying boy, "Look down from Heaven on me, Receive me to thy fond embrace Oh, take me home to thee. I've loved my country as my God; To serve them both I've tried.

Bibliographic information