The National Reader: A Selection of Exercises in Reading and Speaking, Designed to Fill the Same Place in the Schools of the United States that is Held in Those of Great Britain by the Compilations of Murray, Scott, Enfield, Mylius, Thompson, Ewing and Others (Google eBook)

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Richardson, Lord, and Holbrook, 1831 - Readers - 276 pages
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Contents

12 Criminality of Intemperance H Ware Jr
27
The Worm Missouri is
29
Debt and Credit Trenton Emporium
31
The Indians of North America Cincinnati Nat Republican
33
Story and Speech of Logan Jefferson
35
Grandeur and Interest of American Antiquities T Flint
43
The American Indian as he was and as he is C Sprague
47
The Grave a Place of Rest Mackenzie
49
2C Obedience to the Commands of God rewarded Moodie
56
Promises of Religion to the Young Alison
57
On the Swiftness of Time Johnson
58
Page
61
Obidah the Journey of a Day Id
62
The Vision of Mirza Addison
66
The Widow and her Son C Edwards
72
The Little Man in Black W Irving
75
The same concluded Ibid
78
Danger of being a good Singer London Literary Chronicle
82
The Countij Clergyman Goldsmith
84
Parody on The Country Clergyman Blackwoods Ed Mag
86
Elegy on Mrs Mary Blaize Goldsmith
88
The Sick Man and the Angel Gay
89
The Voice of the Seasons Alison
90
Anecdote of Richard Jackson London Quarterly Review
91
Description of Niagara Falls Howison
92
Niagara Fallsfrom the Spanish U S Literary Gazette
96
Cataract of Terni Anonymous
98
A West Indian Landscape MalteBrun
101
Devotional Influences of Natural Scenery Blackwoods Ed Mag
102
Passage of the Shenandoah through the Blue Ridge Jefferson
105
The Blind Boy Bloomfield
106
A Thought on Death Mrs Barbauld
107
Sunday Evening Bowring
109
The Star of Bethlehem J G Percival
110
The Funeral of Maria Mackenzie
111
A Leaf from The Life of a LookingGlass Miss J Taylor
113
The silent Expression of Nature Anonymous
117
Industry necessary to Genius V Knox
121
Story of Matilda Goldsmith
123
The Man of Ross Pope
125
Early Recollections New Monthly Magazine
126
On visiting a Scene of Childhood Blackwoods Ed Magazine
129
The little Graves Anonymous
131
Lesson Pago
145
The Seasons Mrs Barbauld
149
March Bryant
151
April Longfellow
152
May J G Percival
153
89 Childhood and Manhood An Apologue Crabbe
162
The Skies Bryant
163
Song of the Stars Bryant
164
Letters from the East Came
169
9G That ye through his poverty might be rich IV Russell
178
Elijah fed by Ravens Grahame
179
The Summit of Mount Sinai Montgomery
184
Religious Education necessary Greenwood
185
Alice Fell Wordsworth
191
The Eolian Harp European Magazine
193
Burial of Sir John Moore Charles Wolfe
194
War unnatural and unchristian Mellen
195
First Sottloment of the Pilgrims in New England abridged
196
Claim of the Pilgrims to the Gratitude and Reverence
205
Song of the Pilgrims T C Upham
210
Landing of the Pilgrims Mrs Hemans
211
The Pilgrim Fathers Pierpont
212
Character of the Puritan Fathers Greenwood
213
Extract from a Speech on the American Colonies Lord Chatham
219
The samo concluded Ibid
227
Elegy in a Country Churchyard Gray
231
The Grave of KCrner Mrs Hemans
235
Gods First Temples A Hymn Bryant
236
Hymn of Nature Peabody
239
Lines on revisiting the Country Bryant
241
127 Account of the Battle of Bunkers Hill Bolta 242
242
Warrens Address before the Battle of Bunkers Hill Pierpont
250
Hymn commemorative of the Battle of Bunkers Hill Id
251
Whats hallowed Ground Campbell
255
Extract from an Address on Bunkers Hill D Webster 350
257
Extract from the same Ibid
263
The School Boy Amulet 2G6
266
Stanzas addressed to the Greeks Anonymous
267
Spanish Patriots Song Anon
268
The Three Warnings Mrs Thrale
269
The Mariners Dream Dimond
272
Absalom Willis
274

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Page 265 - On its annual return they will shed tears, copious, gushing tears, not of subjection and slavery, not of agony and distress, but of exultation, of gratitude, and of joy. Sir, before God^ I believe the hour is come. My judgment approves this measure, and my whole heart is in it. All that I have, and all that I am, and all that I hope, in this life, I am now ready here to stake upon it ; and I leave off, as I begun, that live or die, survive or perish, I am for the Declaration.
Page 194 - By the struggling moonbeam's misty light, And the lantern dimly burning. No useless coffin enclosed his breast, Nor in sheet nor in shroud we wound him ; But he lay like a warrior taking his rest, With his martial cloak around
Page 21 - OH THAT I were as in months past, as in the days when God preserved me; When his candle shined upon my head, and when by his light I walked through darkness...
Page 85 - Wept o'er his wounds, or, tales of sorrow done. Shouldered his crutch, and showed how fields were won. Pleased with his guests, the good man learned to glow, And quite forgot their vices in their woe ; Careless their merits or their faults to scan, His pity gave ere charity began.
Page 68 - There were indeed some persons, but their number was very small, that continued a kind of hobbling march on the broken arches, but fell through one after another, being quite tired and spent with so long a walk.
Page 222 - We have petitioned ; we have remonstrated; we have supplicated; we have prostrated ourselves before the throne, and have implored its interposition to arrest the tyrannical hands of the ministry and parliament. Our petitions have been slighted ; our remonstrances have produced additional violence and insult; our supplications have been disregarded; and we have been spurned with contempt from the foot of the throne.
Page 198 - This is a misery much to be lamented, for though they were burning and shining lights in their times, yet they penetrated not into the whole counsel of God, but were they now living, would be as willing to embrace further light as that which they first received.
Page 67 - The valley that thou seest, said he, is the vale of misery, and the tide of water that thou seest is part of the great tide of eternity. What is the reason, said I, that the tide I see rises out of a thick mist at one end, and again loses itself in a thick mist at the other? What thou seest, said he, is that portion of eternity which is called time, measured out by the sun, and reaching from the beginning of the world to its consummation. Examine now...
Page 263 - Sink or swim, live or die, survive or perish, I give my hand and my heart to this vote.
Page 144 - And his servants came near, and spake unto him, and said, My father, if the prophet had bid thee do some great thing, wouldest thou not have done it ? how much rather then, when he saith to thee, Wash, and be clean?

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