Lectures on materia medica and therapeutics (Google eBook)

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S. S. & W. Wood, 1856 - 559 pages
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Page 319 - ... a custom loathsome to the eye, hateful to the nose, harmful to the brain, dangerous to the lungs, and in the black stinking fumes thereof nearest resembling the horrible Stygian smoke of the pit that is bottomless.
Page 318 - ... stones, a sovereign remedy to all diseases. A good vomit, I confess, a virtuous herb, if it be well qualified, opportunely taken, and medicinally used ; but as it is commonly abused by most men, which take it as tinkers do ale, 'tis a plague, a mischief, a violent purger of goods, lands, health; hellish, devilish and damned tobacco, the ruin and overthrow of body and soul.
Page 318 - Tobacco, divine, rare, superexcellent Tobacco, which goes far beyond all their panaceas, potable gold, and philosopher's stones, a sovereign remedy to all diseases. A good vomit, I confess, a virtuous herb, if it be well qualified, opportunely taken, and medicinally used, but, as it is commonly abused by most men, which take it as Tinkers do Ale, 'tis a plague, a mischief, a violent purger of goods, lands, health, hellish, devilish, and...
Page 417 - It was not till the end of the 13th century, that spirits of wine, impregnated with certain herbs, was introduced into use as a remedy in the treatment of disease. The first ardent spirit known in Europe was made from grapes, and sold as a medicine both in Italy and Spain. The Genoese afterwards prepared it from grain, and sold it in small bottles, at a very high price, under the name of aqua vita, or the water of life.
Page 531 - Without presuming to affirm that it is capable of eradicating the distemper in every instance, my opinion, on the whole, is that the muriate of gold will effect all that is achieved by the muriate of quicksilver, with incomparably less inconvenience to the patient. He gets well under the operation of the former without the hazard of a sore mouth or a salivation, and with very little wear and tear of constitution.
Page 301 - ... although bloodletting is never to be neglected in the earlier stages of the disease, my own experience is, that more recoveries from head affections of the most alarming aspect take place under the use of very strong purging, than under any other mode of treatment.
Page 318 - The Anatomy of Melancholy was the only work which Burton produced. After the 8th edition (1676), the book seems to have fallen into neglect, till Dr Johnson's remark, that it was the only book that ever took him out of bed two hours sooner than he wished to rise, again directed attention to it.
Page v - Office of the District Court of the United State! for the Southern District of New York.
Page 300 - The author acknowledges that, in the present state of our information on the subject, we are not able to say, with confidence, what symptoms indicate inflammation of the substance of the brain, as distinguished from inflammation of its membranes.
Page 340 - ... till I got upon the deck, when the cloak also was laid aside. Three buckets full of salt water were then thrown at once on me ; the shock was great, but I felt immediate relief. The head-ache and other pains instantly abated, and a fine glow and diaphoresis succeeded. Towards evening, however, the febrile symptoms threatened a return, and I had again recourse to the same method as before, with the same good effect.

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