Natasha's Dance: A Cultural History of Russia

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Macmillan, Oct 21, 2002 - History - 728 pages
19 Reviews
History on a grand scale-an enchanting masterpiece that explores the making of one of the world's most vibrant civilizations

A People's Tragedy, wrote Eric Hobsbawm, did "more to help us understand the Russian Revolution than any other book I know." Now, in Natasha's Dance, internationally renowned historian Orlando Figes does the same for Russian culture, summoning the myriad elements that formed a nation and held it together.

Beginning in the eighteenth century with the building of St. Petersburg-a "window on the West"-and culminating with the challenges posed to Russian identity by the Soviet regime, Figes examines how writers, artists, and musicians grappled with the idea of Russia itself-its character, spiritual essence, and destiny. He skillfully interweaves the great works-by Dostoevsky, Stravinsky, and Chagall-with folk embroidery, peasant songs, religious icons, and all the customs of daily life, from food and drink to bathing habits to beliefs about the spirit world. Figes's characters range high and low: the revered Tolstoy, who left his deathbed to search for the Kingdom of God, as well as the serf girl Praskovya, who became Russian opera's first superstar and shocked society by becoming her owner's wife.

Like the European-schooled countess Natasha performing an impromptu folk dance in Tolstoy's War and Peace, the spirit of "Russianness" is revealed by Figes as rich and uplifting, complex and contradictory-a powerful force that unified a vast country and proved more lasting than any Russian ruler or state.
  

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Review: Natasha's Dance: A Cultural History of Russia

User Review  - Peter Ellwood - Goodreads

I read this, knowing that Orlando Figes' name was under a bit of a cloud because he had admitted to writing one or two positive reviews of his own work on the likes of Amazon or Goodreads; and because ... Read full review

Review: Natasha's Dance: A Cultural History of Russia

User Review  - Liz Polding - Goodreads

A thoroughly enjoyable tour of Russia's cultural history that makes me want to re-read all those Russian novels that I loved so much, especially Tolstoy. The last chapters convey some of the appalling ... Read full review

Contents

CHILDREN OF l8l2
72
THE PEASANT MARRIAGE
219
IN SEARCH OF THE RUSSIAN SOUL
292
DESCENDANTS OF GENGHIZ KHAN
358
RUSSIA THROUGH THE SOVIET LENS
434
RUSSIA ABROAD
526
Notes
587
Glossary
643
Acknowledgements
657
Index
691
Copyright

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About the author (2002)

Orlando Figes is the author of Peasant Russia, Civil War, and A People's Tragedy: The Russian Revolution, 1891-1924, which received the Wolfson Prize for History and the Los Angeles Times Book Prize, among other distinctions. A regular contributor to The New York Times, The Washington Post, The Times Literary Supplement, and London Review of Books, Figes professor of history at Birbeck College, University of London. He lives in Cambridge, England, with his wife and two daughters.

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