Rascally Signs in Sacred Places: The Politics of Culture in Nicaragua

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University of North Carolina Press, 1995 - History - 569 pages
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David Whisnant provides a comprehensive analysis of the dynamic relationship between culture, power, and policy in Nicaragua over the last 450 years. Spanning a broad spectrum of popular and traditional expressive forms--including literature, music, film, and broadcast media--the book explores the evolution of Nicaraguan culture, its manipulation for political purposes, and the opposition to cultural policy by a variety of marginalized social and regional groups.

Within the historical narrative of cultural change over time, Whisnant skillfully discusses important case studies of Nicaraguan cultural politics: the consequences of the unauthorized removal of archaeological treasures from the country in the nineteenth century; the perennial attempts by political factions to capitalize on the reputation of two venerated cultural figures, poet Ruben Dario and rebel General Augusto C. Sandino; and the ongoing struggle by Nicaraguan women for liberation from traditional gender relations.

Originally published in 1995.

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About the author (1995)

David E. Whisnant holds appointments in English, folklore, American studies, Latin American studies, and communications studies at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. His books include "Modernizing the Mountaineer: People, Power, and Planning in Appalachia" and "All That Is Native and Fine: The Politics of Culture in an American Region".

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