Letters written during her travels in Europe, Asia et Africa (Google eBook)

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Page 111 - Eurotas. The great lady still leads the dance, and is followed by a troop of young girls, who imitate her steps, and, if she sings, make up the chorus. The tunes are extremely gay and lively, yet with something in them wonderfully soft. The steps are varied according to the pleasure of her that leads the dance, but always in exact time, and infinitely more agreeable than any of our dances...
Page 258 - I received the news of Mr. Addison's being declared secretary of state with the less surprise, in that I knew that post was almost offered to him before. At that time he declined it, and I really believe that he would have done well to have declined it now. Such a post as that, and such a wife as the Countess, do not seem to be, in prudence, eligible for a man that is asthmatic ; and we may see the day when he will be heartily glad to resign them both.
Page 134 - The workmanship of Heaven certainly excels all our weak imitations, and I think has a much better claim to our praise.
Page 131 - Vizier's ; and the very house confessed the difference between an old devotee and a young beauty. It was nicely clean and magnificent. I was met at the door by two black eunuchs, who led me through a long gallery between two ranks of beautiful young girls, with their hair finely plaited, almost hanging to their feet, all dressed in fine light damasks, brocaded with silver. I was sorry that decency did not permit me to stop to consider them nearer.
Page 134 - Her fair maids were ranged below the sofa, to the number of twenty, and put me in mind of the pictures of the ancient nymphs. I did not think all nature could have furnished such a scene of beauty.
Page 121 - ... doctors very particularly about it, if I knew any one of them that I thought had virtue enough to destroy such a considerable branch of their revenue for the good of mankind. But that distemper is too beneficial to them not to expose to all their resentment the hardy wight that should undertake to put an end to it. Perhaps, if I live to return, I may, however, have courage to war with them.
Page 120 - ... are not superstitious, who choose to have them in the legs, or that part of the arm that is concealed. The children or young patients play together all the rest of the day, and are in perfect health to the eighth.
Page 132 - ... embroidered; and at her feet sat two young girls about twelve years old, lovely as angels, dressed perfectly rich, and almost covered with jewels. But they were hardly seen near the fair Fatima (for that is her name), so much her beauty effaced every thing I have seen, nay, all that has been called lovely either in England or Germany.
Page 167 - ... close joined together, of the most lively green, perfectly matched, every one as large as a half-crown piece, and as thick as three crown pieces ; and another of small emeralds, perfectly round. But her earrings eclipsed all the rest. They were two diamonds, shaped exactly like pears, as large as a big hazel-nut.
Page 110 - ... over your Homer here with an infinite pleasure, and find several little passages explained that I did not before entirely comprehend the beauty of ; many of the customs and much of the dress then in fashion being yet retained. I...

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