The Sundering Flood

Front Cover
Wildside Press LLC, 2001 - Fiction - 384 pages
0 Reviews
The Sundering Flood, among the last of Morris's works, was published in 1897, after his death. The beautiful prose and rich use of language are typical of Morris and fill the reader with a sense of awe and wonder. The flood of the title is nothing less than a river, metaphorically as well as literally dividing two lovers. And there is the fantastic, too: Dwarf Folk, A Magic Sword, and An Ageless Warrior to mentor the Hero. All told, a delightful story certain to appeal to all lovers of classic fantasy. C.S. Lewis and J.R.R. Tolkien both acknowledged the influence of William Morris - The Encyclopedia of Fantasy. No mountains in literature are as far away as the distant mountains of Morris - C.S. Lewis. With his epochal novels of the 1880s, William Morris established the tradition of the tale set in a completely imaginary world of the author's own invention - Lin Carter.
  

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

Of a River called the Sundering Flood and of the Folk that dwelt thereby
1
Of Wethermel and the Child Osberne
8
Wolves harry the Flock
15
Surly John falls out with the Goodman
20
Osberne slays the Wolves
24
They fare to the Cloven Mote
28
Of a Newcomer and his Gift to Osberne
34
The Goodman gets a new Hired Man
40
Warriors from East Cheaping ride into the Dale
109
Osberne takes Leave of Elfhild
114
Osberne is chosen Captain of the Dalesmen
119
A Skirmish with the Baron of Deepdale in the Marshes
125
mel
157
Foemen among the West Dalers
177
City
262
The Red Lad takes Leave of Sir Godrick
268

The Bight of the Cloven Knoll
43
Osberne and Elfhild hold Converse together
51
Osberne shoots a Gift across the Flood
58
Of a Guest called Way wearer
65
Steelhead gives Osberne the Sword Board cleaver
70
Steelhead takes Leave of Osberne
75
Surly John brings a Guest to Wethermel
78
Hardcastle would seize Wethermel
85
Osberne slayeth Hardcastle
93
Osberne tells Elfhild of the Killing of Hard castle
97
The Winter passes and Elfhild tells of the Death of her Kinswoman
100
Osberne fares to East Cbeaping and brings Gifts for Elfhild
105
Osberne is beguiled by Felons
275
Chap LIU They come to Wetbermel and the Carline
288
The Blue Knight buys the Maiden of
299
LV1I The Maiden hears Tidings of a Toung
326
The Blue Knight and his Host leave
332
The Maiden and the Carline flee to
338
They escape from the Chapmen by
349
The Carline endeth her Tale
355
Osberne and Elfhild make themselves
363
LXVl The Lord of Longshaw gathereth Force
371
Copyright

Common terms and phrases

About the author (2001)

Morris was the Victorian Age's model of the Renaissance man. Arrested in 1885 for preaching socialism on a London street corner (he was head of the Hammersmith Socialist League and editor of its paper, The Commonweal, at the time), he was called before a magistrate and asked for identification. He modestly described himself upon publication (1868--70) as "Author of "The Earthly Paradise,' pretty well known, I think, throughout Europe." He might have added that he was also the head of Morris and Company, makers of fine furniture, carpets, wallpapers, stained glass, and other crafts; founder of the Society for the Protection of Ancient Buildings; and founder, as well as chief designer, for the Kelmscott Press, which set a standard for fine book design that has carried through to the present. His connection to design is significant. Morris and Company, for example, did much to revolutionize the art of house decoration and furniture in England. Morris's literary productions spanned the spectrum of styles and subjects. He began under the influence of Dante Gabriel Rossetti with a Pre-Raphaelite volume called The Defence of Guenevere and Other Poems (1858); he turned to narrative verse, first in the pastoral mode ("The Earthly Paradise") and then under the influence of the Scandinavian sagas ("Sigurd the Volsung"). After "Sigurd," his masterpiece, Morris devoted himself for a time exclusively to social and political affairs, becoming known as a master of the public address; then, during the last decade of his life, he fused these two concerns in a series of socialist romances, the most famous of which is News from Nowhere (1891).

Bibliographic information