Testimonies to the Most High, drawn from the books of nature and revelation, by the author of 'Sunday evenings at home'. (Google eBook)

Front Cover
1861
0 Reviews
  

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 56 - Ye ice-falls! ye that from the mountain's brow Adown enormous ravines slope amain—- Torrents, methinks, that heard a mighty voice, And stopped at once amid their maddest plunge! Motionless torrents! silent cataracts! Who made you glorious as the gates of Heaven Beneath the keen full moon? Who bade the sun Clothe you with rainbows ? Who with living flowers Of loveliest blue, spread garlands at your feet?— God!
Page 195 - BLESS the LORD, O my soul : And all that is within me, bless his holy name. Bless the LORD, 0 my soul, And forget not all his benefits : Who forgiveth all thine iniquities; Who healeth all thy diseases; Who redeemeth thy life from destruction ; Who crowneth thee with lovingkindness and tender mercies ; Who satisfieth thy mouth with good things ; So that thy youth is renewed like the eagle's.
Page 20 - DIM as the borrow'd beams of moon and stars To lonely, weary, wandering travellers, Is Reason to the soul : and as on high, Those rolling fires discover but the sky, Not light us here ; so Reason's glimmering ray Was lent, not to assure our doubtful way, But guide us upward to a better day. And as those nightly tapers disappear, When day's bright lord ascends our hemisphere ; So pale grows Reason at Religion's sight ; So dies, and so dissolves in supernatural light.
Page 13 - THE groves were God's first temples. Ere man learned To hew the shaft, and lay the architrave. And spread the roof above them, — ere he framed The lofty vault, to gather and roll back The sound of anthems ; in the darkling wood, Amidst the cool and silence, he knelt down, And offered to the Mightiest solemn thanks And supplication.
Page 71 - Sweet is the breath of morn, her rising sweet, With charm of earliest birds ; pleasant the sun, When first on this delightful land he spreads His orient beams, on herb, tree, fruit, and flower, Glistening with dew ; fragrant the fertile earth After soft showers ; and sweet the coming on Of grateful evening mild ; then silent night, With this her solemn bird, and this fair moon, And these the gems of heaven, her starry train...
Page 184 - He that planted the ear, shall he not hear? he that formed the eye, shall he not see?
Page 137 - Almighty's form Glasses itself in tempests; in all time, Calm or convulsed, — in breeze, or gale, or storm, Icing the pole, or in the torrid clime Dark heaving; — boundless, endless, and sublime. The image of eternity, the throne Of the Invisible; even from out thy slime The monsters of the deep are made; each zone Obeys thee; thou goest forth, dread, fathomless, alone.
Page 191 - These are spots in your feasts of charity, when they feast with you, feeding themselves without fear : clouds they are without water, carried about of winds ; trees whose fruit withereth, without fruit, twice dead, plucked up by the roots ; Raging waves of the sea, foaming out their own shame ; wandering stars, to whom is reserved the blackness of darkness for ever.
Page 21 - This is good, and pleases God our Savior, who wants all men to be saved and to come to a knowledge of the truth.
Page 180 - I saw a great multitude which no man could number, of all nations, and tribes, and peoples, and tongues, standing before the Throne, and in the sight of the Lamb, clothed with white robes, and palms in their hands...

Bibliographic information