The Gentleman's Magazine, and Historical Chronicle, for the Year ..., Volume 214 (Google eBook)

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Edw. Cave, 1736-[1868], 1863 - Literature
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Page 464 - July 14, 1890, are legal tender for all debts, public and private, except where otherwise expressly stipulated in the contract. United States notes are legal tender for all debts, public and private, except duties on imports and interest on the public debt.
Page 485 - Nay, so far was it from the purpose of the Church of England to forsake and reject the Churches of Italy, France, Spain, Germany, or any such like churches, in all things which they held and practised, that, as the apology of the Church of England confesseth, it doth with reverence retain those ceremonies which do neither endamage the Church of God, nor offend the minds of sober men : and only departed from them in those particular points, wherein they were fallen both from themselves in their ancient...
Page 463 - The moon on the east oriel shone, Through slender shafts of shapely stone, By foliaged tracery combined ; Thou would'st have thought some fairy's hand, "Twixt poplars straight, the osier wand, In many a freakish knot, had twined ; Then framed a spell, when the work was done, And changed the willow wreaths to stone.
Page 497 - The sea-kings' daughter as happy as fair, Blissful bride of a blissful heir, Bride of the heir of the kings of the seaŚ O joy to the people and joy to the throne, Come to us, love us and make us your own : For Saxon or Dane or Norman we, Teuton or Celt, or whatever we be, We are each all Dane in our welcome of thee, Alexandra!
Page 111 - Whilst a female sovereign has a great many disadvantages in comparison with a king, yet if she is married, and her husband understands and does his duty, her position, on the other hand, has many compensating advantages, and, in the long run, will be found even to be stronger than that of a male sovereign. But this requires that the husband should entirely sink his own individual existence in that of his wife...
Page 484 - And if any of the bread and wine remain unconsecrated, the Curate shall have it to his own use ; but if any remain of that which was consecrated, it shall not be carried out of the Church, but the Priest, and such other of the Communicants ns he shall then call unto him, shall, immediately after the Blessing, reverently eat and drink the same.
Page 157 - Who wears his hat, or spur, or o'erturns a bell, Or, by unskilful handling, mars a peal ; Let him pay sixpence for each single crime, 'Twill make him cautious 'gainst another time ; But if the sexton's fault an hind'rance be, ' We call from him a double penalty.
Page 335 - His sword hath neither rusted for want of use, nor surfeiteth of blood ; but, after many threats, is unsheathed, as the dreadful instrument of divine revenge. He is the guard of good laws ; the refuge of innocency; the comet of the guilty; the pay-master of good deserts ; the champion of justice ; the patron of peace ; the tutor of the Church ; the father of his Country ; and, as it were, another God upon earth.
Page 334 - A Melancholy Man Is one, that keeps the worst company in the world, that is, his own, and though he be always falling out and quarrelling with himself, yet he has not power to endure any other conversation. His head is haunted, like a house, with evil spirits and apparitions, that terrify and fright him out of himself, till he stands empty and forsaken. His...
Page 111 - ... but, making his position entirely a part of the Queen's, " continually and anxiously to watch every part of the public business, in order to be able to advise and assist her at any moment in any of the multifarious and difficult questions brought before her...

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