Multi-Mediated Dostoevsky: Transposing Novels Into Opera, Film, and Drama (Google eBook)

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Northwestern University Press, Jan 17, 2011 - Literary Criticism - 245 pages
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Since their publication, the works of Dostoevsky have provided rich fodder for adaptations to opera, film, and drama. While Dostoevsky gave his blessing to the idea of adapting his work to other forms, he believed that "each art form corresponds to a series of poetic thoughts, so that one idea cannot be expressed in another non-corresponding form." In Multi-Mediated Dostoevsky, Alexander Burry argues that twentieth-century adaptations (which he calls "transpositions") of four of Dostoevsky’s works—Sergei Prokofiev’s opera The Gambler, Leos Janacek’s opera From the Dead House, Akira Kurosawa’s film The Idiot, and Adrzej Wajda’s drama The Devils—follow Dostoevsky’s precept by bringing to light underdeveloped or unappreciated aspects of Dostoevsky’s texts rather than by slavishly attempting to recreate their sources. Burry’s interdisciplinary approach gives his study broad appeal to scholars as well as to students of Russian, comparative literature, music, film, drama, and cultural studies.

  

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Contents

Introduction Dostoevsky and Transposition
3
1 Transposition as Criticism
16
2 The Artist as Gambler Prokofiev and Dostoevsky
37
3 Voices of the Folk Janáčeks From the House of the Dead
70
4 Secularizing Dostoevskys Positively Good Man Kurosawas The Idiot
107
5 Restaging Two Sources Wajdas The Devils
139
Afterword
174
Appendix A Musical Examples from Prokofiev The Gambler
177
Appendix B Musical Examples from Janáček From the House of the Dead
189
Notes
199
Works Cited
225
Index
237
Copyright

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About the author (2011)

Alexander Burry is an assistant professor of Slavic and East European Languages and Literatures at the Ohio State University.

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