Empires of Intelligence: Security Services and Colonial Disorder After 1914 (Google eBook)

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University of California Press, Sep 9, 2007 - Africa, North - 446 pages
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How did Great Britain and France, the largest imperial powers of the early twentieth century, cope with mounting anticolonial nationalism in the Arab world? What linked domestic opponents and foreign challengers in the Middle East and North Africa Syria, Palestine, Transjordan, Iraq, Tunisia, Algeria, Morocco, and Egypt as inhabitants attempted to overthrow the European colonial order? What strategies did the British and French adopt in the face of these threats? "Empires of Intelligence, "the first study of colonial intelligence services to use recently declassified reports, argues that colonial control in the British and French empires depended on an elaborate security apparatus. Martin Thomas shows for the first time the crucial role of intelligence gathering in maintaining imperial control in the years before decolonization.
  

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Review: Empires of Intelligence: Security Services and Colonial Disorder after 1914

User Review  - Anthony - Goodreads

Reading this book a second time made me appreciate Thomas's take on viewing history through the lens of intelligence services. Gives diplomatic history, normally a dreary and stuffy affair, a revitalization. Read full review

Contents

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About the author (2007)

Martin Charles Thomas is Professor of Colonial History in the Department of History at the University of Exeter. He is a director of the University's Centre for the Study of War, State and Society, an interdisciplinary research centre that supports research into the impact of armed conflict and collective violence on societies and communities.

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