The Chersonese with the Gilding Off, Volume 2 (Google eBook)

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R. Bentley and Son, 1885 - Malaya
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Page 222 - Dutch half-caste has a wretched habitation, mostly made of attap. We sat there for some time. It looked most miserable, the few things about being empty bottles and meat-tins. A man would need many resources, great energy, and an earnest desire to do his duty, in order to save him from complete degeneracy. He has no better prospect from his elevation than a nearly level plateau of mangrove swamps and jungle, with low hills in the distance, in which the rivers rise. It was hot rather. In the...
Page 200 - Perhaps it was right to dissemble your love, But why did you kick me downstairs ? UNKNOWN.
Page 212 - ... rejoiced, but with no ungenerous joy, when their principles of trade, of jurisprudence, of foreign policy, of religious liberty, became the principles of the Administration. They were content that he who came into fellowship with them at the eleventh hour should have a far larger share of the reward than' those who had borne the burden and heat of the day. In the year 1828, a single division in this House changed the whole policy of the government with respect to the Test and Corporation Acts....
Page 105 - In the meantime it seemed extremely doubtful whether I could remain undiscovered where I was until help should arrive, and I began to think of all the stories I had heard of Malays on the war-path, and to wonder if, like other savages, they were in the habit of torturing their victims before putting them to death. In the midst of these speculations, which had just then a painful and personal interest for me, I suddenly heard the Penghulu dictating a letter, apparently to Mr.
Page 221 - ... raised a few feet above the slime of a mangrove swamp ; and on the other an expanse of slime, with larger houses on stilts, and an attempt at a street of Chinese shops, and a gambling-den, which I entered, and found full of gamblers at noon-day. The same place serves for a spirit and champagne shop. Slime was everywhere oozing, bubbling, smelling putrid in the sun, all glimmering, shining, and iridescent, breeding fever and horrible life ; while land-crabs boring holes, crabs of a brilliant turquoise-blue...
Page 105 - I immediately jumped to the conclusion, from what I had known of the quarrel between Captain Lloyd and the Penghulu, that the latter had planned the murder; and I wondered if I were 'the humble instrument destined by Providence' to be the means of hanging the Penghulu as high as Human. In the meantime it seemed extremely doubtful whether I could remain undiscovered where I was until help should arrive, and I began to think of all the stories I had heard of Malays on the war-path, and to wonder if,...
Page 104 - This did not seem to convince the questioner, who called out : ' Mem Perak ! mem Perak !' (lady from Perak) ' where are you? Do not fear; we are your friends. Come out !' I felt so sure by this time that I was the only survivor from a general massacre of the English and their followers for I had made up my mind that the dead Chinaman of whom they spoke was Apat, my servant that I resisted without difficulty this polite invitation to come and be murdered, as I considered it. In fact, the more...
Page 104 - ... sea.' This did not seem to convince the questioner, who called out : ' Mem Perak ! mem Perak !' (lady from Perak) ' where are you? Do not fear; we are your friends. Come out !' I felt so sure by this time that I was the only survivor from a general massacre of the English and their followers for I had made up my mind that the dead Chinaman of whom they spoke was Apat, my servant that I resisted without difficulty this polite invitation to come and be murdered, as I considered it. In fact,...
Page 235 - ... been faithfully reported from time to time in my correspondence . . . and the regulations which were made public on my first arrival have been carried out, and every year, as the country became more settled, has permitted these to be further modified in practice in favour of the servile classes. 4. It is quite true that Mr. Innes, when acting, in the absence of Mr. Paul, as Superintendent of Lower Perak, expressed to me his disinclination to carry out the regulations of the Government he served,...
Page 103 - ... acquaintance with them I had never before known them to be all quiet simultaneously. The poor little things had kept up a constant wailing night and day, from not being accustomed to their new nurse ; so that now, when there was so much additional cause for their crying, their silence seemed most unnatural. I would have given a great deal at that moment to have heard again the pitiful wailing that had kept me awake on the first night of my arrival. Presently I heard one of the Malays inquiring...

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