An Introduction to Logic (Google eBook)

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Clarendon Press, 1906 - Logic - 564 pages
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Page 3 - But God has not been so sparing to men to make them barely two-legged creatures, and left it to Aristotle to make them rational...
Page 189 - An elementary school is a school, or department of a school, at which elementary education is the principal part of the education there given, and does not include any school or department of a school at which the ordinary payments, in respect of the instruction, from each scholar, exceed ninepence a week (Elementary Education Act, 1870, sec.
Page 164 - Had I but served God as diligently as I have served the king, He would not have given me over in my grey hairs.
Page 15 - A name is a word taken at pleasure to serve for a mark which may raise in our mind a thought like to some thought we had before, and which being pronounced to others may be to them a sign of what thought the speaker had before in his mind.
Page 185 - Either the predicate B belongs to the subject A, as somewhat which is contained (though covertly) in the conception A; or the predicate B lies completely out of the conception A, although it stands in connection with it. In the first instance, I term the judgment analytical, in the second, synthetical.
Page 397 - If two or more instances of the phenomenon under investigation have only one circumstance in common, the circumstance in which alone all the instances agree is the cause (or effect) of the given phenomenon.
Page 477 - Every particle of matter in the universe attracts every other particle with a force that varies directly as the product of their masses, and inversely as the square of the distance between them.
Page 505 - The angles at the base of an isosceles triangle are equal to one another; and if the equal sides be produced, the angles -upon the other side of the base shall be equal.
Page 132 - All concrete general names are connotative. The word man, for example, denotes Peter, Jane, John, and an indefinite number of other individuals, of whom, taken as a class, it is the name.
Page 170 - With a sweet emotion ; Nothing in the world is single ; All things by a law divine In one another's being mingleó Why not I with thine...

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