The modern pocket Hoyle: containing all the games of skill and chance as played in this country at the present time, being an authority on all disputed points (Google eBook)

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Dick & Fitzgerald, 1868 - Card games - 387 pages
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Page 18 - The player on the dealer's right cuts the pack, and in dividing it, must not leave fewer than four cards in either packet ; if in cutting, or in replacing one of the two packets...
Page 22 - If any one play two cards to the same trick, or mix his trump, or other card, with a trick to which it does not properly belong, and the mistake be not discovered until the hand is .played out, he is answerable for all consequent revokes he may have made. If, during the play of the hand, the error be detected, the tricks may be counted face downwards, in order to ascertain whether there be among them, a card too many : should this be the case they may be searched, and the card restored ; the player...
Page 18 - If, whilst dealing, a card be exposed by the dealer or his partner, should neither of the adversaries have touched the cards, the latter can claim a new deal ; a card exposed by either adversary gives that claim to the dealer, provided that his partner has not touched a card ; if a new deal does not take place, the exposed card cannot be called.
Page 21 - If a player, who has rendered himself liable to have the highest or lowest of a suit called, fail to play as desired, or if when called on to lead one suit, lead another, having in his hand one or more cards of that suit demanded, he incurs the penalty of a revoke.
Page 20 - If a player, or players, under the impression that the game is lost —or won — or for other reasons — -throw his or their cards on the table face upwards, such cards are exposed, and liable to be called, each player's by the adversary ; but should one player alone retain his hand, he cannot be forced to abandon it.
Page 15 - THE RUBBER. 1. The rubber is the best of three games. If the first two games be won by the same players, the third game is not played. SCORING. 2. A game consists of five points. Each trick, above six, counts one point.
Page 361 - When there shall be less than five players on a side, neither byes nor overthrows shall be allowed, nor shall the striker be caught out behind the wicket, nor stumped out.
Page 21 - If any player lead out of turn, and the other three have followed him, the trick is complete, and the error cannot be rectified ; but if only the second, or the second and third, have played to the false lead, their cards, on discovery of the mistake, are taken back ; there is no penalty against any one, excepting the original offender...
Page 360 - Over," but not until the ball shall be finally settled in the Wicket-keeper's or Bowler's hand; the ball shall then be considered dead ; nevertheless, if an idea be entertained that either of the Strikers is out, a question may be put previously to, but not after the delivery of the next ball. XLV. The Umpire must take especial care to call "No Ball" instantly upon delivery ; " Wide Ball " as soon as it shall pass the Striker.
Page 357 - Crease must be in a line with the stumps; six feet eight inches in length; the Stumps in the centre, with a return crease at each end towards the Bowler, at right angles. 5. The Popping Crease must be four feet from the wicket, and parallel to it; unlimited in length, but not shorter than the Bowling Crease.

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