Turn Here Sweet Corn: Organic Farming Works (Google eBook)

Front Cover
U of Minnesota Press, 2012 - 335 pages
12 Reviews

When the hail starts to fall, Atina Diffley doesn’t compare it to golf balls. She’s a farmer. It’s “as big as a B-size potato.” As her bombarded land turns white, she and her husband Martin huddle under a blanket and reminisce: the one-hundred-mile-per-hour winds; the eleven-inch rainfall (“that broccoli turned out gorgeous”); the hail disaster of 1977. The romance of farming washed away a long time ago, but the love? Never. In telling her story of working the land, coaxing good food from the fertile soil, Atina Diffley reminds us of an ultimate truth: we live in relationships—with the earth, plants and animals, families and communities.

A memoir of making these essential relationships work in the face of challenges as natural as weather and as unnatural as corporate politics, her book is a firsthand history of getting in at the “ground level” of organic farming. One of the first certified organic produce farms in the Midwest, the Diffleys’ Gardens of Eagan helped to usher in a new kind of green revolution in the heart of America’s farmland, supplying their roadside stand and a growing number of local food co-ops. This is a story of a world transformed—and reclaimed—one square acre at a time.

And yet, after surviving punishing storms and the devastating loss of fifth-generation Diffley family land to suburban development, the Diffleys faced the ultimate challenge: the threat of eminent domain for a crude oil pipeline proposed by one of the largest privately owned companies in the world, notorious polluters Koch Industries. As Atina Diffley tells her David-versus-Goliath tale, she gives readers everything from expert instruction in organic farming to an entrepreneur’s manual on how to grow a business to a legal thriller about battling corporate arrogance to a love story about a single mother falling for a good, big-hearted man.

  

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Review: Turn Here Sweet Corn: Organic Farming Works

User Review  - Beverly Atkinson - Goodreads

A real page turner! Atina Diffley writes passionately about the details of true organic farming. When she was a teenager she left home and entered the co-operative food culture, carrying her family's ... Read full review

Review: Turn Here Sweet Corn: Organic Farming Works

User Review  - Nicole - Goodreads

departure from my normal genre of book and couldn't be more pleased. Atina is a wonderful author and kept me interested with each chapter. Honest and educational without be overbearing. can't wait to find a local organic farm. Read full review

Contents

Cold Hard Water
1
My Name Is Tina
13
Its Not Here
22
The Other Has My Heart
32
Forward through Fire
45
Past in the Present
49
Springs Fault 1985
54
Songbirds Nesting
64
If Soil Is Virgin
170
Maison Diffley
178
Spring Covenant 1994
187
Fertile Ground
198
The Difference
208
The Real World of Fresh Produce
224
Living in the Relative Present
239
Looking to the Future
255

Ancient Need
73
Rock and Bird
84
Health Is True Wealth
93
Drought of 88
101
Endangered Species
112
Nomads
122
As If It Never Existed
132
What to Hold On To
143
Subsoil Is the Mineral Base
150
Eureka
160
Kale versus Koch
271
Definitely Not Fungible
285
Soil versus Oil
298
Organic Integrity
309
Hail Thaws into Life
322
Normal Process
327
Postscript
330
Gratitude
333
Copyright

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About the author (2012)

Atina Diffley is an organic farmer, author, public speaker and consultant. From 1973 to 2008, Atina and her husband Martin owned and operated Gardens of Eagan, one of the first certified organic produce farms in the Midwest. The award-winning video documentary Turn Here Sweet Corn, filmed when the 5th generation Diffley family farm was lost to development, focuses on the loss of greenbelt farmlands to suburbia. In 2006, when the Diffley’s second farm was threatened with eminent domain by a Koch Industries crude oil pipeline, Atina worked with consumers and government to create the Minnesota Organic Mitigation Plan. Atina can be reached at www.atinadiffley.com

Bibliographic information